Scrolling Headlines:

Hot outside shooting leads UMass over Georgia -

December 16, 2017

Minutemen knock off Georgia for big statement win -

December 16, 2017

Cale Makar selected to play for Team Canada at the 2018 World Junior Championships -

December 15, 2017

UMass men’s basketball looks to remain undefeated at home when Georgia comes to town -

December 15, 2017

Editorial: Our shift to a primarily digital world -

December 13, 2017

Makar, Ferraro off to Ontario to compete for Team Canada’s World Junior hockey team -

December 12, 2017

Lecture attempts to answer whether treatment of depression has resulted in over-prescription of SSRIs -

December 12, 2017

Palestinian students on campus react to President Trump’s recent declaration -

December 12, 2017

Smith College hosts social media panel addressing impact of social media on government policies -

December 12, 2017

GOP Tax Plan will trouble working grad students -

December 12, 2017

Mario Ferraro making his mark with UMass -

December 12, 2017

Minutewomen look to keep momentum going against UMass Lowell -

December 12, 2017

Ames: UMass hockey’s turnaround is real, and it’s happening now -

December 12, 2017

When your favorite comedian is accused of sexual assault -

December 12, 2017

A snapshot of my college experience -

December 12, 2017

Homelessness is an issue that’s close to home -

December 12, 2017

Allowing oil drilling in Alaska sets a dangerous precedent -

December 12, 2017

‘She’s Gotta Have It’ is a television triumph -

December 12, 2017

Some of my favorite everyday brands -

December 12, 2017

Berkeley professor researches high-poverty high school -

December 11, 2017

The Wrestler at Amherst Cinema

If anyone has seen any awards show or heard any movie buzz it has had to include the buzz about “The Wrestler” and Mickey Rourke’s performance.

The movie is shot mostly on a hand-held camera, following behind Rourke who gives a marvelous performance that involves using his whole body and emotional spectrum being beaten and pummeled to a pulp. It isn’t just the staples that break Rourke’s ribs, it is also the heartbreak and loneliness that he must endure. His daughter hates him. He is locked out of his trailer on many nights and is played for his money by another actor, a stripper.

The performances in the film are what makes actors and actresses so rich. Marisa Tomei and Evan Rachel Wood shine in this downbeat film. Both are looking for different things from their father and must both realize that his career has determined just who he is. they have to see that to understand him, no matter how much it hurts.

The Oscar nods here are worthy. Except Aronofsky probably deserves one for his direction.

Keep your eyes out for this one. Check it out (if you can take a good amount of blood and violence. Remember most wrestling is fake) at Amherst Cinema.

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