Scrolling Headlines:

Political discourse heats up at Amherst College -

September 19, 2017

Author Thomas Suarez leads talk on Israel-Palestine conflict -

September 19, 2017

Q&A with DKMS ambassador -

September 19, 2017

SPIRE changes to include more gender and sexual orientation options -

September 19, 2017

Massachusetts men’s soccer looks for first road win of the season -

September 19, 2017

Top 25 notebook: Mason Rudolph and No. 6 Oklahoma State roll past Pittsburgh -

September 19, 2017

Streaking UMass men’s soccer stares down final non-conference team -

September 19, 2017

Let’s embrace innovation -

September 19, 2017

First response is important, but a long-term response is too -

September 19, 2017

Traveling through a changing life -

September 19, 2017

Community and local goods mix at student farmer’s market -

September 19, 2017

Fifth annual Poetry Festival reading -

September 19, 2017

Peacemaker Najeeba Syeed discusses interfaith cooperation in a time of Islamaphobia -

September 18, 2017

UMass hosts lecture on the meaning of the word ‘genocide’ -

September 18, 2017

Thirty-three arrested, 18 hospitalized during first weekend of semester -

September 18, 2017

UMass women’s soccer stuns Yale on Marra’s late winner -

September 18, 2017

UMass men’s soccer slips past Colgate 1-0 -

September 18, 2017

UMass field hockey wins weekend set over Davidson, UML -

September 18, 2017

Strong second half leads Massachusetts men’s soccer over Colgate -

September 18, 2017

Being promiscuous helps me cope and there’s nothing wrong with that -

September 18, 2017

The Wrestler at Amherst Cinema

If anyone has seen any awards show or heard any movie buzz it has had to include the buzz about “The Wrestler” and Mickey Rourke’s performance.

The movie is shot mostly on a hand-held camera, following behind Rourke who gives a marvelous performance that involves using his whole body and emotional spectrum being beaten and pummeled to a pulp. It isn’t just the staples that break Rourke’s ribs, it is also the heartbreak and loneliness that he must endure. His daughter hates him. He is locked out of his trailer on many nights and is played for his money by another actor, a stripper.

The performances in the film are what makes actors and actresses so rich. Marisa Tomei and Evan Rachel Wood shine in this downbeat film. Both are looking for different things from their father and must both realize that his career has determined just who he is. they have to see that to understand him, no matter how much it hurts.

The Oscar nods here are worthy. Except Aronofsky probably deserves one for his direction.

Keep your eyes out for this one. Check it out (if you can take a good amount of blood and violence. Remember most wrestling is fake) at Amherst Cinema.

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