Scrolling Headlines:

Co-chair of women’s march on Washington Linda Sarsour talks resisting the age of Trump -

April 29, 2017

Late-inning grand slam gives Dayton 5-2 win over UMass baseball -

April 28, 2017

GEO holds rally for better working conditions -

April 28, 2017

Prison Abolition Collective spreads awareness of mass incarceration -

April 27, 2017

Co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington, Linda Sarsour, to speak at UMass Friday -

April 27, 2017

UMass tennis sets sights for Atlantic 10 tournament -

April 27, 2017

Weather postpones UMass softball as it sets its sights on weekend series with La Salle -

April 27, 2017

UMass men’s lacrosse preps for final regular season game with CAA tournament looming -

April 27, 2017

‘Girls’ gives an honest farewell with final season -

April 27, 2017

Don’t stress too much about spoilers -

April 27, 2017

Reserving the right energy for the final push -

April 27, 2017

An unexpected impact -

April 27, 2017

White dove, red ribbon -

April 27, 2017

Making hard decisions in college -

April 27, 2017

Marc Osten fondly remembered by student activism community -

April 26, 2017

New Design Building officially opened -

April 26, 2017

New natural gas pipeline proposed between Easthampton and Holyoke -

April 26, 2017

UMass men’s lacrosse to honor seniors Friday against Drexel -

April 26, 2017

UMass baseball bullpen getting stronger as the season goes on -

April 26, 2017

Assistant coach Ben Barr, a major reason for UMass hockey’s prized recruiting class -

April 26, 2017

The Wrestler at Amherst Cinema

If anyone has seen any awards show or heard any movie buzz it has had to include the buzz about “The Wrestler” and Mickey Rourke’s performance.

The movie is shot mostly on a hand-held camera, following behind Rourke who gives a marvelous performance that involves using his whole body and emotional spectrum being beaten and pummeled to a pulp. It isn’t just the staples that break Rourke’s ribs, it is also the heartbreak and loneliness that he must endure. His daughter hates him. He is locked out of his trailer on many nights and is played for his money by another actor, a stripper.

The performances in the film are what makes actors and actresses so rich. Marisa Tomei and Evan Rachel Wood shine in this downbeat film. Both are looking for different things from their father and must both realize that his career has determined just who he is. they have to see that to understand him, no matter how much it hurts.

The Oscar nods here are worthy. Except Aronofsky probably deserves one for his direction.

Keep your eyes out for this one. Check it out (if you can take a good amount of blood and violence. Remember most wrestling is fake) at Amherst Cinema.

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