Scrolling Headlines:

Candlelight vigil held to mourn deaths of victims of police violence -

September 27, 2016

UMass hosts William A. Douglass for lecture and chair in Basque cultural studies -

September 27, 2016

Amherst Select Board discusses imposing fines on those who violate water usage ban -

September 27, 2016

UMass tennis opens season on high note with performance at Brown Invitational -

September 27, 2016

UMass women’s soccer using long break to prepare for Atlantic 10 play -

September 27, 2016

Notebook: Ford ‘takes step forward,’ Williams appears on SportsCenter -

September 27, 2016

UMass cross country and track and field coach Ken O’Brien hits half century mark with program -

September 27, 2016

A-10 soccer notebook: Duquesne shuts out Robert Morris 1-0 to win fourth straight -

September 27, 2016

The blue light situation: When is enough, enough? -

September 27, 2016

Survivor; awesome yet evil -

September 27, 2016

A ‘Mirror’ into Clinton’s campaign -

September 27, 2016

UMass a cappella groups S#arp Attitude and The Hexachord’s on ‘Sing It On’ television series -

September 27, 2016

‘Through the Photographer’s Eyes’ exhibit highlights photojournalism in today’s media -

September 27, 2016

Designer collaborations steal the show at New York Fashion Week SS17 -

September 27, 2016

Massachusetts drought heavily impacts local agriculture -

September 26, 2016

UMass Soccer earns second win of season in 3-2 victory over Hartford -

September 26, 2016

‘Morris from America’ explores teen angst and the struggles of growing up -

September 26, 2016

‘Hell or High Water’ an intense, morally ambiguous modern Western -

September 26, 2016

Read: You won’t regret it -

September 26, 2016

UMass field hockey hangs tough, falls to No. 18 Stanford -

September 26, 2016

STAR Fellowship makes UMass’ water safer

By: Emily Reynolds                     

 

Remember last spring when there were a whole lot of stories about how the water we’re all drinking is contaminated with different pharmaceutical drugs? There are antibiotics, anti-depressants, pain medications and a whole myriad of other drugs that make their way from human bodies to the water supply.

It turns out that there are enough drugs in the water to actually concern scientists about what kind of effect it will have on the ecosystem, including humans, plants and animals.

Luckily, there are lots of people working on this problem, and one of them happens to be University of Massachusetts graduate student Kirsten Studer. Studer is getting $37,000 a year from the Environmental Protection Agency’s STAR fellowship to study estrogen in the water supply.

Studer is part of a larger group from the civil and environmental engineering department, which is studying drugs in the water.

While each individual drug in the water may not be harmful, the interaction between drugs can cause a lot of problems. Estrogen can screw up all of the hormones and glands that go along with puberty, and can cause cancer.            

That is why Studer is not just studying what the estrogen does, but also how to get it out of the water supply without doing any more damage.

So, next time there’s a glass of water sitting on the counter, think of all the drugs that could be going into the body by mistake, even if it is filtered by Brita.

Emily Reynolds can be reached at ereynold@student.umass.edu

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