Scrolling Headlines:

Softball sweeps Saint Joseph’s to take over first place in the Atlantic 10 -

April 24, 2017

Report: UMass men’s basketball lands Maryland transfer Jaylen Brantley -

April 24, 2017

UMass baseball takes two out of three in weekend series with La Salle -

April 24, 2017

UMass men’s lacrosse can’t keep pace with Hofstra in road loss -

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Senior Columns 2016-2017 -

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Q&A with UMass student app creator -

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UMass women’s lacrosse squeaks past George Mason 18-17 -

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Events in Turkey today echo patterns of Armenian genocide -

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LGBTQIA+ Seder discusses oppressed communities gaining insight for the future -

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Even crowd-pandering can’t dull the brilliance of Actress’ ‘AZD’ -

April 24, 2017

UMass Earth Day Festival focuses on local community -

April 24, 2017

Ten ways to save the environment that will not change your life -

April 24, 2017

Aakanksha Gupta reflects on her time at the Collegian and UMass -

April 24, 2017

The Collegian: A place of opportunity where I found home -

April 24, 2017

There’s no other organization on campus I’d rather be a part of -

April 24, 2017

Students and community members gather to celebrate science for Earth Day -

April 24, 2017

Quick Hits: A few standout performances highlight UMass football’s annual spring game -

April 21, 2017

Northampton cited as city choosing not to comply with ICE -

April 20, 2017

MASSPIRG hosts seminar on hunger and homelessness -

April 20, 2017

University Union hosts debate on Electoral College -

April 20, 2017

STAR Fellowship makes UMass’ water safer

By: Emily Reynolds                     

 

Remember last spring when there were a whole lot of stories about how the water we’re all drinking is contaminated with different pharmaceutical drugs? There are antibiotics, anti-depressants, pain medications and a whole myriad of other drugs that make their way from human bodies to the water supply.

It turns out that there are enough drugs in the water to actually concern scientists about what kind of effect it will have on the ecosystem, including humans, plants and animals.

Luckily, there are lots of people working on this problem, and one of them happens to be University of Massachusetts graduate student Kirsten Studer. Studer is getting $37,000 a year from the Environmental Protection Agency’s STAR fellowship to study estrogen in the water supply.

Studer is part of a larger group from the civil and environmental engineering department, which is studying drugs in the water.

While each individual drug in the water may not be harmful, the interaction between drugs can cause a lot of problems. Estrogen can screw up all of the hormones and glands that go along with puberty, and can cause cancer.            

That is why Studer is not just studying what the estrogen does, but also how to get it out of the water supply without doing any more damage.

So, next time there’s a glass of water sitting on the counter, think of all the drugs that could be going into the body by mistake, even if it is filtered by Brita.

Emily Reynolds can be reached at ereynold@student.umass.edu

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