Scrolling Headlines:

Massachusetts drought heavily impacts local agriculture -

September 26, 2016

UMass Soccer earns second win of season in 3-2 victory over Hartford -

September 26, 2016

‘Morris from America’ explores teen angst and the struggles of growing up -

September 26, 2016

‘Hell or High Water’ an intense, morally ambiguous modern Western -

September 26, 2016

UMass field hockey hangs tough, falls to No. 18 Stanford -

September 26, 2016

Read: You won’t regret it -

September 26, 2016

Racism in the LGBTQ community -

September 26, 2016

Harvard professor discusses race, power and science in academia -

September 26, 2016

‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ is a stop-motion masterpiece -

September 26, 2016

Editorial: The Massachusetts Daily Collegian Mission Statement -

September 26, 2016

Amherst Police Dept. uses pepper spray to disperse party on Hobart Lane -

September 26, 2016

UMass football can’t overcome four third quarter Mississippi State touchdowns, fall 47-35 Saturday -

September 24, 2016

UMass football’s fourth quarter comeback attempt falls short against Mississippi State Saturday -

September 24, 2016

Cyr: Despite improvement, UMass football still can’t capture first marquee FBS win -

September 24, 2016

MassPIRG kicks off for the fall semester -

September 22, 2016

UMass Resistance Studies Initiative hosts activist and author George Lakey -

September 22, 2016

UMass field hockey readies for tough tests against Stanford, Boston College -

September 22, 2016

Calling the shots: everything you need to know about the flu vaccine -

September 22, 2016

UMass assistant Professor speaks about oppression of American Indians -

September 22, 2016

Astronomy department head hosting sundial and sky-watching event -

September 22, 2016

The U.S. and the Afro-Latino Movement

By: Gisel Saillant

Yes, the Afro-Latino movement. The images the media are sending out do not capture the influence of the African Diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean. For example, Colombian actress Sofia  Vergara was asked by Hollywood producers to dye her naturally blonde hair black to look more Hispanic. This is a common, stereotypical image we are fed, in this case of the “eses” of Los Angeles.

With the filtered images we receive from the media, an actress dyeing her hair should not be as serious as the lack of Afro-Latino representation in the media. Dominican actress Zoe Saldana has yet to play a “Hispanic” role. Her African phenotype does not match the Latina images we are fed. All the roles Zoe Saldana has portrayed thus far have been African-American.

The information I want to share on the Afro-Latino Movement happening in Latin America showcases the complexities of the people that make up these countries. It’s important to realize the different manners in which race is constructed worldwide. The American black/white binary does not allow for wiggle room to find some shades in between. Also, that is not to say that racism does not exist in Latin America, because it’s about skin gradation, and everyone is mixed.

I want to share a video and some links about Venezuelan activist Jesus “Chucho” Garcia. During his visit to UMass, Garcia explained the “African” reaffirmation happening within the Afro-Latino population in their goals to be incorporated as citizens. Garcia goes into detail about the Afro-Venezuelans’ struggle to incorporate history about the Afro-Venezuelans in the curriculum. Also, he notes how involved the U.S has been in supporting the movements and the causes that are being organized by the Afro-Latino networks. Garcia explains that it’s all part of an American interventionist agenda . Garcia says that if the U.S supports the Afro-Latino population, then they would support a future intervention by the U.S.

Check it out… 

Jesus Chucho Garcia on Motionbox

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