Scrolling Headlines:

Panel held to discuss the future of public policy and the Universal Basic Income -

October 17, 2017

Reconsidering Hillary Clinton -

October 17, 2017

Trump’s Twitter has unprecedented influence on society -

October 17, 2017

Author and professor at the University of Oregon discusses the push of a corporate agenda through state governments -

October 17, 2017

Letter: Join the movement against student debt -

October 17, 2017

Northampton City Council votes to oppose local charter school expansion -

October 17, 2017

UMass men’s soccer takes on Rhode Island with top conference spot on the line -

October 17, 2017

Fulton, Smith leading the way for UMass Soccer offensively -

October 17, 2017

UMass field hockey loses to Northwestern in double overtime -

October 17, 2017

The remote: a bridge between two siblings -

October 17, 2017

UMass Style Watch: Jenny Pham -

October 17, 2017

Sports Editors S1 E5: This one goes off the rails -

October 16, 2017

Members of the Pioneer Valley’s Native community march in celebration of Indigenous Peoples Day -

October 16, 2017

Club hockey skates to 1-1 tie with UMass Lowell -

October 16, 2017

UMass men’s soccer moves to 8-0-1 at home in win over La Salle -

October 16, 2017

It’s time to break the mold on breaking up -

October 16, 2017

‘MASSEDUCTION’ is St. Vincent at her best -

October 16, 2017

Beck’s ‘Colors’ is fun, well-crafted nightclub simplicity -

October 16, 2017

UMass hockey beats AIC 3-1 to win third straight -

October 15, 2017

Two goals from freshman John Leonard lead UMass hockey to 3-1 victory Saturday -

October 15, 2017

The U.S. and the Afro-Latino Movement

By: Gisel Saillant

Yes, the Afro-Latino movement. The images the media are sending out do not capture the influence of the African Diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean. For example, Colombian actress Sofia  Vergara was asked by Hollywood producers to dye her naturally blonde hair black to look more Hispanic. This is a common, stereotypical image we are fed, in this case of the “eses” of Los Angeles.

With the filtered images we receive from the media, an actress dyeing her hair should not be as serious as the lack of Afro-Latino representation in the media. Dominican actress Zoe Saldana has yet to play a “Hispanic” role. Her African phenotype does not match the Latina images we are fed. All the roles Zoe Saldana has portrayed thus far have been African-American.

The information I want to share on the Afro-Latino Movement happening in Latin America showcases the complexities of the people that make up these countries. It’s important to realize the different manners in which race is constructed worldwide. The American black/white binary does not allow for wiggle room to find some shades in between. Also, that is not to say that racism does not exist in Latin America, because it’s about skin gradation, and everyone is mixed.

I want to share a video and some links about Venezuelan activist Jesus “Chucho” Garcia. During his visit to UMass, Garcia explained the “African” reaffirmation happening within the Afro-Latino population in their goals to be incorporated as citizens. Garcia goes into detail about the Afro-Venezuelans’ struggle to incorporate history about the Afro-Venezuelans in the curriculum. Also, he notes how involved the U.S has been in supporting the movements and the causes that are being organized by the Afro-Latino networks. Garcia explains that it’s all part of an American interventionist agenda . Garcia says that if the U.S supports the Afro-Latino population, then they would support a future intervention by the U.S.

Check it out… 

Jesus Chucho Garcia on Motionbox

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