Scrolling Headlines:

2017 Hockey Special Issue -

October 19, 2017

International Relations Club tackles tough issues at ‘Foreign Policy Coffee Hour’ -

October 19, 2017

Sexual assault spikes on campus -

October 19, 2017

Californian students react to wildfires back home -

October 19, 2017

‘My Little Pony: The Movie’ is a surprising animated treat, whether you’re a fan of the show or not -

October 19, 2017

With a young team, Carvel is preparing the UMass hockey team to thrive -

October 19, 2017

Letter: UMass hockey is great, but where are the students? -

October 19, 2017

Boino’s blast gives UMass men’s soccer sole possession of first place in the Atlantic 10 -

October 19, 2017

UMass freshmen look to play physical, make an impact and improve early on -

October 19, 2017

UMass hockey sets out to create new program, identity in 2017-18 -

October 19, 2017

Cale Makar: UMass hockey’s crown jewel -

October 19, 2017

Ames: If first four games are any indicator, this UMass hockey season could differ for the better -

October 19, 2017

Josh Couturier looks to find where he fits within UMass lineup -

October 19, 2017

The straw man fallacy: missing the point on Indigenous Peoples Day -

October 19, 2017

Power to the Thin Mint: improve the Girls Scouts program -

October 19, 2017

‘Blade Runner 2049’ has a lot of ideas that it fails to develop -

October 19, 2017

Early season challenge awaits for UMass hockey in weekend set with Ohio State -

October 18, 2017

UMass Professor Barbara Krauthamer receives award from Association of Black Women Historians -

October 18, 2017

The 2017-18 women’s soccer team differs from others Matz has coached at UMass -

October 18, 2017

Hockey East Notebook: OT Goal caps BC comeback over Providence -

October 18, 2017

Professor Forbes implanted the cancer-fighting protein into mice with breast tumors

University of Massachusetts Amherst chemical engineering professor Neil Forbes has successfully implanted the cancer-fighting protein TRAIL into mice with breast tumors and activated it. According to a release, 100 percent of the mice survived over the next 30 days after the cancer-fighting protein was implanted.

TRAIL stands for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and it is a short group of connected amino acids, known as a peptide, which targets cancer cells. It forms a bond with a cancer cell and triggers apoptosis, or programmed cell death.

According to a release, scientists had known that several common bacteria, such as salmonella, are attracted to cancer cells more than they are attracted to healthy cells. When a variety of salmonella that does not cause disease was genetically engineered, Forbes designed experiments with Sabha Ganai, a surgical oncologist with the Pioneer Valley Life Sciences Institute to see if the safe salmonella could move the TRAIL protein directly to solid tumors.

The experiment was successful. Ganai and Forbes engineered a bacterium called Salmonella typhimurium to carry the TRAIL peptide and made sure that it would only be activated by a protein responsible for DNA repair normally found in E. coli called the RecA promoter.

The modified bacterium was injected into groups of genetically identical mice who had breast cancer. After two days, according to the release, the bacteria had multiplied to around 10 million in each tumor. Then each group was given either a single dose or a double dose of low level radiation. The radiation damaged the bacterial DNA slightly but enough to activate the RecA promoter protein and trigger the production of TRAIL. Most importantly, the use of TRAIL and the modified Salmnonella typhimurium bacteria poses minimal danger to the patient.

Each group did well with the treatment; however the group that received two doses of radiation showed the most improvement.

According to the release, Ganai and Forbes believe that in the future, cancer patients will be able to receive injections of the bacteria and the light irradiation therapy with much less suffering than they experience now.

The experiments were supported with funding from the National Cancer Institute and Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The findings have appeared in the “British Journal of Cancer.”  

Matthew M. Robare can be reached at mrobare@student.umass.edu.

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