Scrolling Headlines:

Makar, Ferraro off to Ontario to compete for Team Canada’s World Junior hockey team -

December 12, 2017

Lecture attempts to answer whether treatment of depression has resulted in over-prescription of SSRIs -

December 12, 2017

Palestinian students on campus react to President Trump’s recent declaration -

December 12, 2017

Smith College hosts social media panel addressing impact of social media on government policies -

December 12, 2017

GOP Tax Plan will trouble working grad students -

December 12, 2017

Mario Ferraro making his mark with UMass -

December 12, 2017

Minutewomen look to keep momentum going against UMass Lowell -

December 12, 2017

Ames: UMass hockey’s turnaround is real, and it’s happening now -

December 12, 2017

When your favorite comedian is accused of sexual assault -

December 12, 2017

A snapshot of my college experience -

December 12, 2017

Homelessness is an issue that’s close to home -

December 12, 2017

Allowing oil drilling in Alaska sets a dangerous precedent -

December 12, 2017

‘She’s Gotta Have It’ is a television triumph -

December 12, 2017

Some of my favorite everyday brands -

December 12, 2017

Berkeley professor researches high-poverty high school -

December 11, 2017

Rosenberg steps down as Senate President during husband’s controversy -

December 11, 2017

Students aim to bring smiles to kids’ faces at Baystate Children’s Hospital -

December 11, 2017

‘Growing Cannabis On the Farm’ event held at Hampshire College -

December 11, 2017

UMass women’s basketball defeats Saint Peter’s for third straight win -

December 11, 2017

Celebrity culture could be a part of the problem -

December 11, 2017

UMass ranks high in licensing and patent activity

The University of Massachusetts was recently ranked 13th for total licensing income among institutions, according to a report by the Chronicle of Higher Education.

The data, entitled “Licensing Revenue and Patent Activity, 2008 Fiscal Year,” lists the top universities with patent and license revenue, as well the total research revenue spent to date.

According to the data, UMass has raised nearly $36 million in licenses and grants for the fiscal year.

The University has had two start-up companies formed, 35 licenses executed, has 266 total active licenses, 66 new patent applications, 25 U.S. Patents issued, and has spent $435.2 million total on research. 

Northwestern University rests at the top of the list, having generated $824.4 million in total licensing income.

One such company that was formed, Anellotech Inc., which was co-founded by UMass Professor George Huber, is manufacturing a liquid known as “Green Gasoline,” a chemical equivalent of gasoline, though it is cheaper and cleaner.

Anellotech Inc. was founded in November 2009, and current plans are to open a demonstration plant within two years that would employ 25 people. A commercial plant is in the works as well, and could possibly open within five years. 

Huber said he did not initially have intentions of opening a company, but outside sources convinced him to otherwise.

“CVIP [The Office of Commercial Ventures and Intellectual Properties] was actually the people who wanted the company to be started,” he said.

The company does not actually have any licensing income yet. Several years will pass before it will be able to generate a revenue stream, and once it does, it will have to give some of the revenue to the University.

CVIP, which was established for all five UMass campuses in September of 1995, attempts to commercialize the research that the University system performs.

According to their homepage, CVIP evaluates, protects and commercializes research that could have a possible value and supports starting companies through licensing and commercial firms.

The website states that “CVIP’s other responsibilities  include … proactively marketing UMass technology and negotiating the ‘best deal’ via University agreements.” 

CVIP also is responsible for “working with the Research Liaison & Development in creating relationships with the industry.”

All new inventions under UMass research can be protected with an invention disclosure. When one is filed with CVIP, funding and research can be protected and possibly commercialized. An evaluation for an invention disclosure can take between three weeks and three months, and if it passes, a patent can take up to and over five years for the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to issue or deny a patent.

Huber added that UMass research has great potential, and that when discovered, should be used to the fullest.

“Mike Malone [who was Dean of the College of Engineering at the time] told me that [when] we discover something new at UMass, we have a societal responsibility to try and get it commercialized,” he said. 

Tim Jones can be reached at timothyj@student.umass.edu.

Leave A Comment