Scrolling Headlines:

Cause of death determined for UMass student Chloe Malast -

Monday, July 6, 2015

Nick Mariano, Zach Oliveri transferring from UMass men’s lacrosse program -

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Four months after banning Iranian students from certain graduate programs, UMass announces new measures to ensure compliance with U.S. law -

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Justin King sentenced to eight to 12 years in prison -

Monday, June 29, 2015

Two future UMass hockey players selected in 2015 NHL Draft -

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Supreme Court ruling clears way for same-sex marriage nationwide -

Friday, June 26, 2015

Former UMass center Cady Lalanne taken 55th overall by Spurs in 2015 NBA Draft -

Friday, June 26, 2015

Second of four men found guilty on three counts of aggravated rape in 2012 UMass gang rape case -

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Boston bomber speaks out for first time: ‘I am sorry for the lives I have taken’ -

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

King claims sex with woman was consensual during alleged 2012 gang rape -

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Wrongful death suit filed in death of UMass student -

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Ryan Bamford uses online Q&A session to discuss UMass football conference search, renovation plans, cost of attendance -

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Opening statements delivered, first witnesses called in second trial for alleged 2012 gang rape at UMass -

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

UMass Board of Trustees approves rise in tuition, student fees -

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Former Minutewoman Quianna Diaz-Patterson named to Puerto Rican national softball team -

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

UMass rowing’s Jim Dietz inducted into CRCA Hall of Fame -

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Jury selection begins Monday in second gang rape trial -

Monday, June 15, 2015

Students turn attention to state legislators as decision on UMass budget looms -

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Alumna and next director of Brooklyn Museum Anne Pasternak ‘created her own path’ -

Thursday, June 11, 2015

UMass graduate crowned head of 600-year-old Indian kingdom -

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Eat your way to a greener you

(Courtesy flickr.com/nataliamaynor)

The local food movement is on the rise in the food industry, but chefs aren’t the only ones able to take advantage of fresh, organic food anymore. These days, farmers’ markets, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) shares, and even large grocery store chains are providing the public with the quality ingredients they crave.

The great thing about buying locally-grown products is that it supports both the local economy and the environment as a whole. By buying fresh produce; eggs, cheeses, and even meats from local farmers, you’re often able to cut out the middleman completely. So instead of shopping at a store that orders crates full of produce and has them shipped from California, you’re getting your food from the source itself. Buying directly from farmers cuts down on harmful emissions that would be produced by trucks, boats and planes in order to deliver the ingredients from other parts of the country and the world.

CSA shares are a fantastic way to get in on the local food movement and to really explore the bounty that your area has to offer food-wise. For the last 20 years, CSA shares have helped form relationships between farmers and their neighbors. If you sign up for a share, you’ll pay a set fee in order to receive a weekly box of super fresh produce throughout the farming season. The cost is usually comparable to what you’d spend weekly on produce at a regular store and can often even be cheaper. Typically, the boxes are reused every week, cutting down on waste from conventional shopping bags, as well as reducing emissions that would result from driving to the grocery store on a weekly basis.

Another advantage to buying locally grown products is the organic factor. If you’re able to find a farm around you that grows natural, organic foods free of pesticides and chemicals, you’re essentially helping the environment two-fold. Buying local and organic combines the benefits of reduced emissions with those of chemical-free growing practices. When a farm refrains from using pesticides and chemicals, it helps both you and the environment. Eating organic produce ensures that you are putting only the best things into your body, free of substances for which nature didn’t intend. On a larger scale, it also keeps pesticides and chemicals out of groundwater, which could eventually feed into tributaries, rivers and then oceans. It may seem like a small detail, but the difference between organic and non-organic can make a big difference.

Vibrantly-colored fruits and vegetables have a wide range of vitamins and minerals that are great for our health, and buying locally grown food provides you with the advantage of enjoying colorful ingredients that are often picked that very same day. The less time fruits and vegetables spend on the shelf, the better, because over time, the beneficial vitamins and minerals begin to diminish, making the “healthy foods” you’re eating not as healthy as you may have thought. Buying local equals buying fresh, and nothing tastes better than an ingredient enjoyed immediately after it’s picked or pulled from the earth.

So this Earth Day, do some research on your town’s local food movement. Find out when farmers’ markets open up for the season and look into various options for CSA shares. Start reaping the benefits of your local food scene and help the environment all at the same time. Because one thing’s for sure, eating local will never leave a bad taste in your mouth.

Alex Tillotson can be reached at atillots@student.umass.edu.

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