March 3, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

Meet the 2015 SGA spring election candidates -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Years of dedication lead to breakout senior campaign for Zack LaRue -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Five simple steps to get your college diet on track -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Students head to State House, push for more public higher education funding -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Gabriel Schmitt hopes to improve UMass health services as student trustee -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Barrett/Barbosa ‘ready on day one’ -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

An outsider to the SGA, student trustee candidate Nicholas Vigneau says he brings a fresh perspective to the position -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Kristi Sefanoni pleased with UMass softball’s start to season -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Outsider candidates Rocco Giordano and Dhananjay (Danny) Mirlay Srinivas intent on shoring up student-administration relationship, getting more voices heard -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

UMass tennis wins its first conference match in weekend split -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Minutewomen excel despite injuries, Minutemen gain experience -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

SGA election reforms address some, but not all concerns -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Emily O’Neil hopes to increase diversity and improve Title IX training as student trustee -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

The next journalist under fire -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Letter: A call for action and cooperation -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Student trustee candidate Kabir Thatte looks to create his own path as a UMass legacy student within SGA -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Police Log: Friday, Feb. 27 to Sunday, March 1, 2015 -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Kelly, Gay to focus on transparency, accessibility and sexual assault training -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Easy breathing tricks to de-stress during midterms -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Lack of transparency from Elections Commission endangers spring ballot -

Monday, March 2, 2015

Advertisement

University presses performing strong

Hannah Cohen

The American Association of Publishers (AAP) recently reported exceptionally strong June 2010 book sales for university presses.

The study, compiled by AAP Vice President Tina Jordan, shows that hardcover book sales increased 7.7 percent to $3.4 million, which resulted in a year-to-date increase of 1.9 percent. Paperback sales were identical, with $3.4 million, along with a monthly increase of 8.6 percent and a 1.3 percent year-to-date increase. In the professional book category, June sales were up 2.2 percent, to $59.5 million, which made the year-to-date sales gain 11.4 percent. Voicemails left for Jordan went unanswered.

Despite these phenomenal statistics, University of Massachusetts Press director Bruce Wilcox cautioned this information could be misleading.

“I’m slightly skeptical about those figures,” he said during a telephone interview. “I get a separate set of statistics for the Association of American University Presses (AAUP), and those statistics track just the sales at university presses and not beyond. Most of the AAP sales deal with trade sales and then they have a category.”

The AAP’s website describes the organization as “the principal trade association of the U.S. book trading industry” and that it “represents publishers of all sizes and types throughout the country.” In this sense, the AAP’s statistics could be less significant for UMass as they are broader in scope and include data from smaller college presses.

However, Wilcox noted that the AAUP statistics that he utilizes still show some growth in sales.

“For Fiscal Year ‘10, which ended June 30, overall university presses saw an increase in net sales for the year of 2.3 percent, which is a lot smaller than the [AAP figures],” he added.

A voicemail left with the AAUP press office was returned by an unidentified spokeswoman who said that it was “too early” in the new fiscal year to comment on previous or current changes in sales.

On a final, positive note, Wilcox said the new fiscal year is starting off strong.

“We’re encouraged by the strong sales we’ve experienced in July and August; the fiscal year is off to a very good start,” he said.

According to several new technology updates, those sales just might get stronger. Wilcox mentioned that the UMass press plans to add e-books to the lineup of texts it produces. This feature will start sometime this month.

“We’re going to be part of the Google Editions program,” he said. “We expect to have more than 800 books available through Google Editions.”

“Those books will exist ‘in the cloud’, as they say,” he went on. “And you can either buy them from Google or from an intermediate bookseller such as Barnes & Noble. The idea is that books are available whenever you need them, wherever you need them.”

Add that to the Textbook Annex’s new book-rental policy and students will have two new options for getting their textbooks by the end of this month. And with the average college student spending $900 per year on books, according to Wilcox, this news may well be welcomed warmly by the UMass student body.

Cameron Ford can be reached at cford@dailycollegian.com.

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