Scrolling Headlines:

UMass students came together to Stand Against Racism -

Monday, April 27, 2015

UMass baseball gets swept in four-game road trip to Florida Gulf Coast -

Monday, April 27, 2015

of Montreal and Toro y Moi to co-headline Pearl Street this weekend -

Monday, April 27, 2015

UMass administrators exploit and disrespect graduate students -

Monday, April 27, 2015

Bike Racing Club brings energy and excitement to bike racing -

Monday, April 27, 2015

Sonic Youth’s ‘Bad Moon Rising’ still stands as crucial career turning point -

Monday, April 27, 2015

UMass women’s lacrosse cruises past GW on Senior Day -

Monday, April 27, 2015

How to stay sane during the long summer -

Monday, April 27, 2015

UMass softball drops pair of games against first-place Dayton -

Monday, April 27, 2015

Take Back the Night event raises awareness about sexual violence -

Monday, April 27, 2015

Demetrius Dyson to transfer from UMass basketball -

Saturday, April 25, 2015

UMass men’s lacrosse falls to Delaware 10-9 in regular season finale -

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Brett Anton stands tall against UMass men’s lacrosse, Minutemen stumble into playoffs -

Friday, April 24, 2015

UMass women’s lacrosse cruises toward regular season A-10 championship with win over Richmond -

Friday, April 24, 2015

UMass softball hits the road for big test at Dayton -

Friday, April 24, 2015

Long-time campus radio host banned from WMUA, status of station adviser unclear -

Friday, April 24, 2015

Celebrating 125 years of the Daily Collegian -

Thursday, April 23, 2015

SGA expresses support for Survivor’s Bill of Rights -

Thursday, April 23, 2015

UMass blanked by Boston College in Beanpot Championship -

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Second annual yogathon stresses Earth Day ideals to individuals -

Thursday, April 23, 2015

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The “Unplugged” becomes new minority

Meet Arthur. Arthur owns and runs one of the many street corner news stands found around Philadelphia. Everyday customers come to him for the latest news, gossip and good conversation. On Fridays, Arthur goes to his local mosque for prayer where he is an integral part of the local Muslim community. By all appearances, Arthur is average. Arthur, however, is one of a growing minority that is abandoning cell-phones and computers.

These “willfully unconnected” are the focus of University of Massachusetts communications professor Jarice Hanson’s latest research and were discussed at the Center for Public Policy and Administration’s (CPPA) flagship lecture for their fall colloquium series this past Monday.

The presentation, “The Digitally Divided: The New Minority and Willful Retreat from the Information Society” highlighted Hanson’s findings and their relevance for public policy in a digital age.

According to Hanson, the project was an accident.

In an effort to find real world examples of individuals who have decided to “unplug” for her students, Hanson stumbled upon a hidden “network of unconnected.” What was more, “there was a real pride in being unconnected,” said Hanson. With each interview, Hanson was given more contacts.

But who are these “tech refugees?”

Early on, Hanson explained her focus was on those who – despite available access – willfully abstain from connectivity as opposed to those unable to secure access. She found that most tech hermits fall into three categories: self-employed working adults with no children, urban squatters and the disabled. Most participants were well educated, self-identified as readers and all had been connected at one time. Another commonality was a deep-rooted concern for privacy. “Some have real horror stories concerning privacy in their lives,” said Hanson.

Despite being unconnected, all of those surveyed in Hanson’s study felt that they were as, if not more, informed than the rest of the connected public. What’s more, all 24 participants felt their happiness increased after unplugging.

Robin, a photographer from New York, was interviewed by Hanson, felt her decision relieved daily stress levels. “I don’t want anyone interrupting me, or asking for advice every time they go to buy something new,” explained Robin. According to Hanson, the stress caused by constant connectivity is also being addressed in businesses around the nation who have begun implementing e-mail free days.

Robin’s response also highlights the importance those interviewed placed on their decisions being conscious and deliberate. As Hanson pointed out, this violates the common conception of those who have retreated from technology, “it is not a circumstance, but a choice.”

The conscious aspect of un-connectedness holds important implications for public policy and Hanson believes they have been overlooked.

“We think that this [connectivity] is a natural evolution and that the answer to all our problems is more technology,” commented Hanson on popular public policy viewpoints on technology, “[but] sometimes we’re not asking all the questions.”

The CPPA and the National Center for Digital Government & Science will be hosting four additional seminars through out the semester. The next event, titled “Nanotechnology & Society: Emerging Organizations, Oversight and Public Policy Systems,” will be held at 8 a.m. Friday, Sept. 24, registration is required.

Max Calloway can be reached at maxcalloway@gmail.com.

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