August 30, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Suspect in custody after break-ins on Lincoln Avenue -

Thursday, August 28, 2014

UMass crime alerts reveal reports of lewd acts -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass women’s soccer hopes added depth brings more consistency in 2014 -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass mourns death of alumnus and journalist James Foley -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Kassan Messiah, Trey Seals to shoulder pass rushing responsibility for UMass football -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

UMass names Blake Frohnapfel as the starting quarterback -

Monday, August 18, 2014

Decision looms for Mark Whipple as UMass football looks to name starting quarterback -

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Former UMass star Marcel Shipp overseeing a strong running back competition -

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Former UMass basketball star Chaz Williams signs professional contract in Turkey, still eyeing NBA career -

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Minutemen anxious to display aggressive defense -

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

UMass football turns the page, excited for 2014 season -

Monday, August 4, 2014

UMass student struck and killed by vehicle Thursday night -

Friday, August 1, 2014

UMass receives anonymous $10.3 million gift -

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

UMass football summer coverage 2014 -

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

UMass Rowing finishes NCAA Championships, ends year ranked No. 21 in the nation -

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Two UMass basketball alums to compete for a lofty prize in The Basketball Tournament -

Friday, May 23, 2014

Commencement Photos 2014 -

Thursday, May 15, 2014

What’s in an envelope? One school bets on your enrollment

Courtesy of Fahrzeug

It’s the spring of your senior year of high school, and you come home every day eagerly awaiting that coveted acceptance letter from your top choice school. You visualize the bold letterhead with your school’s logo on it, plan out in your head how you will tear open the manila and know your fate.

One college is seeking to exploit this paradigm to bolster enrollment, and it’s using a rather unique, innovative method to make prospective students feel like it values them. The University of Dayton, in Dayton, Ohio has begun sending accepted students’ admission letters using UPS and DHL express envelopes. The theory goes, according to a Sept. 10 article in the online college news magazine Inside Higher Ed, that students will feel valued by the school and therefore be more likely to enroll.

“We are saying you are not going to be junk mail to us,” said University of Dayton Vice President of Enrollment Management Sundar Kumarasay in the article, “We’re sending a message that you are important.”

The university does not pay for priority mailing, the letters are sent through the United States Postal Service, but the envelopes are made to look just like UPS and DHL envelopes, with help and contracts from the two companies.

The Roman Catholic Liberal Arts University accepted 300 more students than it expected for this year’s class, with 2,065 freshmen, and it has seen a rise in student visits and applications. Kumarasay gives the envelopes credit for enticing new students, but gives the university’s programs and education credit for enrolling them.

The added cost of licensing fees for using UPS and DHL are not much in end, because although tens of thousands of letters are still sent out, the envelopes have increased Internet usage by stirring interest, explained Kumarasay.

One recent Dayton enrollee was not sold, however.

“I think the whole thing’s a little cheesy,” said University of Dayton freshman Shannon Lees. “They seem full of themselves, [Dayton] isn’t Harvard.”

The international studies major and Chicago native said Dayton is a “family school,” with a lot of legacy students, and that she thinks “they would appreciate [the envelopes] more,” than her.

Lees received a certificate with her acceptance letter, something she could “hang on the mantle,” but she says she would rather just a plain letter, something classic and not a gimmick.

Patrick Callahan, a University of Massachusetts spokesman, said the flagship campus of the UMass system will not be looking to a Dayton-style model to attract students.

“We don’t do anything like what Dayton is doing,” said Callahan, “we don’t have any plans to do so in the future.”

Although UMass does not use or plan to use an envelope gimmick to increase campus interest, the school’s admissions officers are not complete strangers to plans such as Dayton’s.

In a Sept. 5 Boston Globe article, UMass Amherst Chancellor Robert Holub said that UMass sends out certificates for financial aid scholarships, calling the strategy a “marketing tool.”

“Instead of just saying, ‘You have a $6,000 scholarship as part of your financial aid package,’ we say ‘Congratulations! You’ve been awarded a Chancellor’s Scholarship for $6,000, and you get a certificate to hang on your wall,’” said Holub in the piece.

Sam Hayes can be reached at sdhayes@student.umass.edu. Sam Butterfield contributed to this article.

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