Scrolling Headlines:

Lawrence Osborn Fossil Collection showcases fossils from across the globe, spanning vast ages -

January 23, 2018

Retired professor and public figure, Julius Lester, passed away at age 78 -

January 23, 2018

UMass looks to maintain discipline in Tuesday’s tilt at Boston College -

January 23, 2018

UMass men’s and women’s swimming and diving earns second place finishes at Dartmouth Invitational -

January 23, 2018

YouTube’s free speech problem -

January 23, 2018

Resolutions should not wait until the new year -

January 23, 2018

Book review: ‘When Breath Becomes Air’ by Paul Kalanithi -

January 23, 2018

Charli XCX’s latest release, ‘Pop 2,’ is another gorgeous experiment on electro-pop -

January 23, 2018

Rashaan Holloway ruled academically ineligible, will miss rest of season -

January 22, 2018

Minutewomen hold on to defeat VCU, snap losing streak -

January 22, 2018

America’s misguided war on low-income financial assistance -

January 22, 2018

Blue lights aren’t needed on campus anymore -

January 22, 2018

Cupcakke’s ‘Ephorize’ proves it’s time to take her seriously -

January 22, 2018

Netflix series ‘The End of the F***ing World’ packs a punch -

January 22, 2018

UMass hockey falls flat in 5-0 loss to Northeastern -

January 20, 2018

UMass women’s track and field takes first, men fourth at Joe Donahue Games -

January 20, 2018

Sanzo: UMass’ game vs. St. Louis is a sign of what it is without its grit -

January 20, 2018

UMass men’s basketball gets blown out by Saint Louis, 66-47 -

January 20, 2018

UMass hockey shuts down No. 8 Northeastern with 3-0 win -

January 19, 2018

Matt Murray hands Northeastern its first shutout of the season -

January 19, 2018

Cases to watch for during the Supreme Court term

Who gets to regulate the sale of violent video games? And what’s the balance between the right to privacy and freedom of speech? Those are two issues to be addressed by the Supreme Court, which began its fall term this week. Here’s a look at two of the more controversial cases the court will hear.

Snyder, Albert v. Phelps, Fred W., et al.

This suit was filed by Albert Snyder, the father of a Marine killed in Iraq against the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kan. Members of the church protested at the funeral of Snyder’s son, Lance Cpl. Matthew A. Snyder. Some signs at the protest carried the message “God Hates Fags,” but the church, led by Pastor Fred W. Phelps, claims they were not directed at the Marine. Snyder claimed that the protesters caused him emotional distress, and he was awarded $11 million jury verdict, which an appeals court later threw out on First Amendment grounds. This case concerns the issue of freedom of speech and First Amendment rights for a group to protest at a private funeral.

Due to the sensitive issue of First Amendment rights, 22 news organizations filed a brief in support of the Westboro Baptist Church’s right to protest at private funerals. Supporters included the Associated Press, the New York Times Co., NPR and the American Civil Liberties Union.

Supporters for Snyder include the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States (VFW), who seek to protect the rights of veterans and believe that the Westboro Baptist Church violated Snyder and his family’s right to privacy.

Schwarzenegger v. Entertainment Merchants Association

This is another high profile First Amendment case, which will decide if states have the right to restrict the sale of violent video games to minors. The court has not set up principles for the regulation of violent material like it has for sexual material, leaving violent materials like video games in a grey area. California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Attorney General Jerry Brown argued that violent video games are similar to sexual materials, which the government can protect children from. The lower court and appeals court, which ruled on the case before the Supreme Court agreed to hear it, both ruled that states did not have the right to regulate the distribution of violent video games to minors under the First Amendment.

Supporters for regulation of the sale of violent video games to children includes the Eagle Forum Education & Legal Defense Fund (EFELDF), a non-profit organization that describes itself as “pro-family.” The organization argued in a brief supporting the restrictions, that violent video games leads to violent and aggressive behavior.

This case has garnered a wide range of supporters for the First Amendment rights of video game distributors including the Motion Picture Association of America and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.

ON THE WEB

News-2-Know is a blog created by B.J. Roche’s Journalism 301 class. Every weekday, an author will write about a topic that is newsworthy and provide links on additional resources. To read the rest of the entries, click here.

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