October 25, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Michael Kimmel speaks to UMass students about ‘Guyland’ -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

UMass football looks for third straight win against Toledo on Saturday -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

‘Love is Strange’ is beautiful, painful and groundbreaking -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

White supremacy and settler colonialism at UMass -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

UMass hockey hopes first win will propel them past Hockey East rivals -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

UMass’ second line playing and succeeding with young talent early in the season. -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

‘The Good Wife’ returns as strong as ever -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Professor receives grant to cover massive election survey panel -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Unions rally over recent concession proposals -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

NFL Pick’em games return to the Massachusetts Daily Collegian -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

UMass celebrates Campus Sustainability Day -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

“Fury” falls just short of greatness -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Minutewomen look to continue their season in weekend game against Saint Bonaventure. -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

New meal plans receive mixed reviews from students -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

ISIS’s magazine is good for the West -

Thursday, October 23, 2014

UMass women’s soccer controls its own destiny as conference tournament approaches -

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

UMass soccer deploys new formation with Keys, Jess -

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

UMass calling on young swimmers to continue strong start to the year -

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

WMU, Ohio, NIU pick up wins in busy MAC weekend -

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A comprehensive guide to the Ebola virus -

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Obama delivers State of the Union 2011 speech

Obama’s hour-long address Tuesday night sought to repel anticipated Republican efforts to roll back his party’s signature legislative achievements, including the health care overhaul, during the next two years.

He emphasized the need for bipartisanship, calling on Democrats and Republicans to work together to create new jobs. “We will move forward together, or not at all _ for the challenges we face are bigger than party, and bigger than politics,” Obama said.

Obama called for a five-year freeze on nonmilitary discretionary spending in a bid to help reduce the deficit and said he would veto any bill containing pet projects known as “earmarks.” He also endorsed $78 billion in Pentagon cuts and said he would consider other reductions.

But he defended his record thus far and warned that while he may agree to tweaks to his legislative record, his top priority in the next two years will be to preserve that work. Especially on his landmark health care law, he called for changes where needed, but warned he would oppose repeal.

“Instead of refighting the battles of the last two years, let’s fix what needs fixing and move forward,” he said.

Instead of the fractious reception he received in his previous State of the Union speech, Obama encountered a more somber welcome in which most lawmakers wore black and white ribbons in honor of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., and the other victims of the Tucson shooting rampage. Republicans and Democrats sat side by side in a show of unity.

Nonetheless, to Republican critics, his call for government investment sounded like another spending package at a time when deep cuts are needed. “That’s the real secret to job creation, not borrowing and spending more money in Washington,” said Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who delivered the GOP response.

Rather than promising a near-term solution to chronic unemployment, Obama devoted much of the speech to the threat of competition for jobs from overseas, urging programs to “out-innovate, out-educate and out-build” the rest of the world.

Obama outlined an agenda for the second half of his term in office that tracks closely with his re-election strategy, in which he is staking out a middle ground politically.

With several promises, Obama sought to address perceptions that he spent too freely during his first two years in power and is unconcerned by a budget deficit that now stands at more than $1.4 trillion. His proposals include freezing federal spending not devoted to national security, which aides said would reduce the deficit by more than $400 billion over 10 years.

Obama said he would be reasonable in any negotiations. Waste and inefficiencies are rampant in government, he said.

But he warned that, as with the health care law, certain steps were off-limits.

Obama signaled that he would protect his signature education program, called “Race to the Top,” which offers grant money to schools that make strides in educating students.

He drew a protective barrier around the basic social safety net, cautioning that he would not slash spending at the expense of “our most vulnerable citizens.”

He added: “Cutting the deficit by gutting our investments in innovation and education is like lightening an overloaded airplane by removing its engine.”

That message is rooted in a hard-eyed calculation by White House aides. Grand new spending programs and initiatives are unrealistic given the political realignment on Capitol Hill. Instead, the White House wants to preserve programs that resurgent Republicans see as targets ripe for elimination.

In some ways, the speech was in keeping with Obama’s move to the center following the Democrats’ midterm election losses. He called for reducing the corporate tax rate, freezing nondefense discretionary spending and approval of free trade agreements that might expand U.S. exports.

Obama showed a willingness to buck members of his party. He said he would veto any bill carrying an “earmark” _ a special spending project that lawmakers pass with little scrutiny or discussion. That stand sets up a potential showdown with one of Obama’s closest allies, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., who defends earmarks.

Equally revealing was what Obama did not say. He said very little new or different about the war in Afghanistan, the effort to halt the Iranian nuclear programs or other foreign policy hot spots. As he has before, he claimed U.S. troops were making progress at stabilizing Afghanistan and at shrinking sanctuaries used by al-Qaida and other militant groups in Pakistan.

He made no mention of climate change legislation, which business interests oppose and which stands little chance of passing in any case. Since his midterm election setback, Obama has tried to repair his relationship with the corporate world.

Obama also sought to reassure members of his liberal base, who’ve bristled over some of his post-midterm moves. He said he was committed to overhauling the nation’s immigration laws and finding a pathway to legal status for the millions of people living in the U.S. illegally. The odds of that happening are low, as Obama essentially conceded.

Comments
One Response to “Obama delivers State of the Union 2011 speech”
  1. It’s really a nice and useful piece of info. I’m satisfied that you just shared this useful information with us. Please keep us informed like this. Thanks for sharing.

Leave A Comment