November 28, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Stanley Andre reflects on his career as Senior Day approaches -

Thursday, November 27, 2014

UMass tight end Jean Sifrin mulls future, potential NFL career -

Thursday, November 27, 2014

UMass basketball trounces Northeastern 79-54 -

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Students and staff discuss racial and social inequality following Ferguson decision -

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

UMass hockey falls to Vermont, 3-1 -

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

No indictment for Ferguson cop -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Chancellor addresses campus regarding grand jury decision in death of Michael Brown -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Northern Illinois hangs on against Ohio, Hunt carries Toledo to victory -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

SGA passes 10 motions at meeting Monday night -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Students and UMPD work together during the annual ‘Walk for Light’ -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

‘Conscious Consumer’ talk promotes business sustainability -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

UMass hockey looks to rebound against Vermont following Saturday’s blowout at home -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

UMass women’s soccer’s Sverrisdóttir balances a soccer career between two different countries -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

‘First Demo’ provides a fascinating glimpse of Fugazi in its infancy -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

My mental illness does define me (to an extent) -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

How to master multitasking -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

One Direction hints at newfound sophistication on ‘Four’ -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

TV on the Radio sounds rejuvenated on ‘Seeds’ -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

UMass men’s club soccer fundraises its way to Memphis -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

UMass hockey takes accountability and seeks redemption against Vermont on Tuesday -

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Identity theft is no vacation

MCT

It’s that time of the year again – time for a nice, stress-free trip away from the cold.

But beware: Whether you’re planning a weekend getaway or a weeklong tropical vacation, if you’re not careful, travel scams could leave you broke and less than relaxed.  Many of these scams are posted in the halls of school buildings, sandwiched in-between legitimate offers and appear oh-so-tempting because of their low prices. But don’t be fooled! According to the Better Business Bureau, these bogus offers con vacationers out of an average of $10 billion annually. So, do some research before you fork over your cash.

Parents are always telling us, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Well, now’s the time to heed their advice. Pay attention to how the deal was presented to you; if you get an email offer, a phone offer, or a flyer in the mail, it’s probably bogus.

Another type of scam making its way around is the “you have won an all-inclusive vacation” as a result of a sweepstakes you never actually signed up for. Usually, the end result of these scams is that whenever you’re ready to take your vacation, the travel company you have booked through has mysteriously disappeared.

These scams sometimes seem like great deals, but they aren’t. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the American Society of Travel Agents (ASTA) have a few tips to help you avoid bogus travel packages and find the real deal:

  • Check out the operator. Avoid high-pressure sales pitches for school break packages. Ask the operator to send you information about the business and a list of satisfied customers.
  • Check with local travel agents to see if the operator is legitimate.
  • Read the fine print. Get a copy of the operator/participant contract. This will tell you the conditions under which the operator can change flight schedules (usually charters can be canceled for any reason by the operator up until 10 days before the trip), hotel accommodations (operators may put you up in an alternate hotel listed in the operator contract that is not as nice as the hotel advertised in the package materials), and the rules and penalties for cancellations. Ask about cancellation insurance.
  • Rules state that an operator cannot ask for or accept your payment until you have signed and returned the contract.
  • Understand your rights. Department of Transportation rules state that you have a right to cancel a charter package without penalty if the operator makes a “major change.” These include a change of departure or return date or city, a hotel substitution to a property not named in the charter operator/participant contract, or a package price increase of more than 10 percent.
  • Pay by credit card. This gives you more protection than using cash or a check/debit card. If you pay by check/debit card for a charter package, make sure it’s payable to an escrow account (as required by federal law for charters) and call the bank handling the account to verify its validity. Be wary of charter operators who are reluctant to provide escrow bank information- they may be selling another firm’s space- or who tell you they’ll send a courier to pick up your money.
  • If you pay for a scam package with a check/debit card, congratulations, chances are you just became another victim of identity theft. Hope you like dealing with your credit card company, bank and federal government. As for cash? Well, you’re never seeing it again.

A good resource for checking out a company’s credibility is the Better Business Bureau website, www.bbb.org. This website allows visitors to enter the company name and address and read reviews, complaints, contact information and more. The website also offers an easy-to-understand grading system for companies from A to F. Just take a gander before you commit to any companies and keep these tips in mind when you’re making your spring break plans.

It would be awful to have an amazing vacation planned, brag about it to your friends, spend a lot of money on it, and have it turn out to be a scam.

Kimberly Wilson is a Collegian columnist. She can be reached at kwilson@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “Identity theft is no vacation”
  1. pulekha says:

    Identity theft has become a major, major problem! And living without protection is like living in a crime infested neighborhood and not having protection on your home. You would probably at least have a really good guard dog and a fence right? Well, not protecting your identity today is the equivalent of living in that neighborhood and refusing to even lock your door. It’s so sad that it’s come to this, but there are always tradeoffs in life. Because we want better medical coverage and a nicer car we pay more to protect and insure them.
    Likewise, with something as amazing as the World Wide Web there come tradeoffs also. One tradeoff for us having access to almost everything is that others have access to almost everything about us, our information. And that includes our personal information like social security numbers, banking information and even your medical and criminal history.
    Luckily there is a lot of information out to help us understand and protect ourselves from these heartless criminals. Here is an informational website put together to help you and your family. We hope you find it helpful. Identity theft

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