November 23, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Micheletto apologizes to fans, aims to regroup following 11-1 loss -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Vermont throttles UMass hockey 11-1 -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

UMass guard Trey Davis: ‘There’s a lot coming at me right now’ -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

UMass ‘big four’ neutralized by Notre Dame in 81-68 loss -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

UMass basketball can’t corral Grant, Irish in 81-68 loss -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Frustration haunts Minutemen in 5-3 loss to Boston College -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

UMass hockey drops 5-3 decision to No. 12 Boston College Friday night -

Saturday, November 22, 2014

UMass hockey prepares for nationally ranked Hockey East foes BC, Vermont -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Food scientist proposes way to improve health via breast milk -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons shine in ‘Whiplash’ -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Masculinity: A feminist’s perspective -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

UMass women’s basketball uses size and speed en route to its first win against Maine -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Why Melissa McBride is the best actor on television -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

‘Gienie’ in a bottle: Patriots, Browns, and Seahawks highlight week 12 picks -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

UMass women’s basketball secures first victory of the season against Maine -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Revisiting ‘The Hobbit’ trilogy as the final installment looms -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Establishing the rules of classroom attendance -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

UMass hockey’s Troy Power reflects as his 100th career game approaches -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Sophomore swimmer Meriza Werenski excelling in increased role -

Thursday, November 20, 2014

SGA senator plans survey on bigotry -

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Escalation in Libya

Libya MCT

(MCT)

Moammar Gadhafi still remains defiant as the United States, France and the United Kingdom have become involved in the Libyan conflict. With the overwhelming violence against rioters, it was clear that other nations had to step in and help facilitate the retreat of Gadhafi’s supporters. The situation became a humanitarian mission to protect the people of Libya, warranting more involvement from the United Nations.

France was among one of the first countries to really support the opposition movement in Libya, going as far as to recognize them as a form of government. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton traveled to Paris two weeks ago to show American support for pro-democracy groups in Libya, as well as to sit down with other European leaders to discuss their options. At that point, the U.S. had maintained support for any opposition groups in the country, foreign sanctions and the freezing of any assets that the government could use against its people, but did not have any real plans of action.

The major development that led to more active U.S. involvement was the U.N. resolution that was passed establishing a no-fly zone over the country. After the implementation of sanctions against the regime was, for the most part, unsuccessful, the U.N. saw fit to put up the question of military involvement to a vote. The most surprising result of this vote was not the passing of the no-fly zone, but was the votes to abstain from Russia and China. Historically, both countries have voted against any violation of the sovereignty of nations. By abstaining, they both passively voted “yes” to the resolution, something that has not been seen since the first Gulf War in the 1990s.

The U.S. air strikes have been called a success in halting Gadhafi supporters. Supporters haven’t been easily deterred though, and have continued to attack the opposition. The latest news from the region reported attacks on hospitals. Although the United States has assumed a sort of leadership position for these strikes in a press conference by Barack Obama during his trip to Chile, the president stated this leadership role would only be temporary. After a few days, the leadership position will be transferred to an international means of control such as NATO. Ground troops have been absolutely ruled out in Libya; air strikes will be the only means of attack.

Throughout the world, Moammar Gadhafi has very few friends, even within the Middle East. At this point he has promised a “long war.” Although that is a statement no one wants to hear, it could very well end up being the truth. Even if he were to go into exile, Gadhafi’s life would be threatened by the enemies he has made during the last 40 years of rule. Gadhafi has few allies and at this point really has nothing to lose, except, of course, Libya.

Brittany McLellan can be reached at bmclella@student.umass.edu.

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