Scrolling Headlines:

UMass women’s basketball handles Duquesne at home -

January 16, 2017

UMass men’s basketball’s late comeback falls short after blowing 15-point first-half lead -

January 15, 2017

UMass hockey outlasted at home against No. 6 UMass Lowell -

January 14, 2017

Hailey Leidel hits second buzzer beater of the season to give UMass women’s basketball win over Davidson -

January 13, 2017

UMass football hosts Maine at Fenway Park in 2017 -

January 12, 2017

UMass men’s basketball snaps losing streak and upsets Dayton Wednesday night at Mullins Center -

January 11, 2017

UMass women’s track and field takes second at Dartmouth Relays -

January 10, 2017

UMass hockey falls to No. 5 Boston University at Frozen Fenway -

January 8, 2017

UMass professor to make third appearance on ‘Jeopardy!’ -

January 8, 2017

UMass women’s basketball suffers brutal loss on road against Saint Joseph’s -

January 7, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops thirds straight, falls to VCU 81-64 -

January 7, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops tightly-contested conference matchup against George Mason Wednesday night -

January 4, 2017

Late-game defense preserves UMass women’s basketball’s win against rival Rhode Island -

January 4, 2017

AIC shuts out UMass hockey 3-0 at Mullins Center -

January 4, 2017

UMass professor to appear as contestant on ‘Jeopardy!’ Thursday night -

January 4, 2017

Penalties plague UMass hockey in Mariucci Classic championship game -

January 2, 2017

UMass men’s basketball falls in A-10 opener to St. Bonaventure and its veteran backcourt -

December 30, 2016

UMass woman’s basketball ends FIU Holiday Classic with 65-47 loss to Drexel -

December 29, 2016

UMass men’s basketball finishes non-conference schedule strong with win over Georgia State -

December 28, 2016

Brett Boeing joins UMass hockey for second half of season -

December 28, 2016

Anthony Bourdain: Chef, author and BAMF

Courtesy Lwp Kommunikáció/Flickr

When picturing alcohol-induced benders, drug-fueled frenzies, and debauchery of all sorts, restaurants are rarely what come to mind. It has been 11 years since chef and author Anthony Bourdain released his crude, bestselling book, “Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly” where he exposed the deeper, darker side of the industry that has been hidden behind those big swinging doors in the back of America’s favorite restaurant. In a brutally honest account, Bourdain recalls his adventures in the world of cooking. He details a life that many may think they would love, but in reality are too soft and weak to last in.

Bourdain’s culinary journey began in Provincetown when he worked in a local restaurant for the summer. Bourdain writes, “The life of a cook was a life of adventure, looting, pillaging and rock-and-rolling through life with a carefree disregard for all conventional morality.”

Bourdain dropped out of Vassar College after that summer. He enrolled in the Culinary Institute of America and worked for various New York City restaurants. “Kitchen Confidential” resonates with anyone who has held a job in a kitchen – from chefs, to waiters, to dishwashers. The book relates to audiences who have dealt with mischievous cooking mishaps firsthand at their place of work. Some may even relate to Bourdain’s late nights struggling in the kitchen, resulting in sleep-deprivation zombie-like state and hours of flirting with waitresses.

“Kitchen Confidential” acts as a valuable guide to those who might think that they want to drop out of college and join the culinary ranks. Bourdain pays great attention to detail while explaining the laborious work that scars hands and sucks the existence of a social life.

In Bourdain’s world, sexual harassment is not uncommon and drugs and alcohol are prevalent. While it might discourage dreamers, it is better to know the reality of being a chef now rather than waiting until the harassment and stress takes its toll. Bourdain vividly describes the tornado of chaos, adrenaline and pressure that comes with being successful or otherwise collapsing in a fiery downfall. This is an underworld where anarchy, thick skin and loyalty stand above all else.
Just like the kitchens he describes, the life of a chef is not beautiful. According to Bourdain there are no fairytale endings; the kitchen staff becomes family. This book is not all horror as it encompasses a strong passion for high-quality food made with skill. “Kitchen Confidential” is a genuine, raw glimpse into a life that most know little about.

Bourdain’s life doesn’t just stop at chef and author – he currently hosts “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations” on the Travel Channel. The Emmy Award winning series displays Bourdain experiencing a cornucopia of cultures and exotic foods. Life and culture are discussed in the series more so than the food. Bourdain explores the roots of his destinations and explains how food is deeply connected to the framework of how people exist. “No Reservations” is open, honest, stylish and shows beauty in places where it may have been overlooked.

This beauty is not shown in mountaintops, but in the heritage of boxing rings in Boston or the excitement of those testing new culinary waters. In the past seven seasons, the series has travelled the globe, moving from industrial capitals to barren reserves that many audiences will never see in their lifetimes. In the latest season, the show travelled to Japan, Kurdistan and the Amazon. The season’s ending should not stop fans from catching any reruns, though. They are constantly playing on Travel Channel and the seasons are available for purchase as well.

Jeff Mitchell can be reached at jjmitche@student.umass.edu

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