Scrolling Headlines:

UMass men’s soccer drops season opener to Utah Valley in overtime -

Friday, August 28, 2015

UMass football notebook: Jackson Porter moves to WR, UMass schedules 2016 game with South Carolina -

Friday, August 28, 2015

Former UMass student who accused four men of rape in 2012 testifies during trial Friday -

Friday, August 28, 2015

REPORT: UMass football’s Da’Sean Downey faces two assault charges in connection with February fight -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

UMass football Media Day: Catching up with Joe Colton -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Creating turnovers, forcing mistakes the focus for linebacking corps -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Jurors hear police interview, read text messages by defendants in third UMass rape trial -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

‘Living at UMass’ app aims to make move-in weekend a breeze -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass rape trial halts abruptly, opening statements delivered Tuesday -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Jamal Wilson returns from injury with confidence he is ‘main guy’ at running back -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Freshmen Sekai Lindsay, Andy Isabella impressing at running back -

Monday, August 24, 2015

UMass ranked in top 25 for LGBTQ students -

Monday, August 24, 2015

UMass football fall camp day five: Rodney Mills looks to continue bringing versatility to tight end position -

Friday, August 21, 2015

Route 9 Diner to reopen under new ownership -

Friday, August 21, 2015

Rising UMass sophomore dies unexpectedly -

Thursday, August 20, 2015

UMass football fall camp day four: Veteran offensive line boasts chemistry, looks to improve run blocking -

Thursday, August 20, 2015

A colorful UMass homecoming -

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Potential nighttime and weekend parking fee at UMass tabled -

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

UMass football fall camp day three: Ex-quarterbacks A.J. Doyle, Andrew Verboys continue transitions to new positions -

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

UMass football fall camp day two: Defensive secondary hopes experience, added depth brings greater consistency -

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

The Sound of Silence

Every time I walk into an exam, I’m always entertaining the same question in my mind: why can’t students listen to music while taking exams? Sure, there’s always the possibility that someone can record the entirety of their testing material and play it back on their iPod, but, putting this aside, I think listening to music during tests could be beneficial rather than detrimental.

People hold different views on the matter, but that could be because they haven’t tried listening to different types of music (or music at all for that matter) while doing their schoolwork. Thus, they prefer silence. For some including myself, silence can be distracting. I do my best work when I’m listening to my music, which is entirely instrumental, like the band Explosions in the Sky. The absence of lyrics prevents me from getting distracted and the instrumentals keep me focused. But obviously not everyone listens to instrumental music. If someone wants to take a calculus exam while listening to Katy Perry, or tackle a philosophy exam while listening to Immortal Technique, then I say all the power to them.

If not everyone enjoys listening to music while doing schoolwork, how then, could a policy of listening to music during tests be instated without disrupting the classroom or the students’ GPAs? Professors could try to restrict the students genres of music to whatever they deem appropriate, like strictly classical and instrumental, but how then could those restrictions actually be enforced?

It’s not as though you could pre-screen everyone’s iPod before the exam. Even if a professor did so, what’s to prevent a student from switching from a professor’s suggestion of Mozart to Pearl Jam? It would be very difficult unless the professor distributed preloaded iPods containing only “acceptable” testing music. Such an effort however would be absurd for obvious reasons. Then perhaps they could rely on an honor code – that anyone who brings an iPod to a test must abide by a certain criteria, for example, the volume has to be low so that no one around you without headphones is disturbed. Still, it seems that there are too many factors to be considered and no way of regulating such a simple thing as listening to music. It appears that unless some prominent, open-minded, carefree and innovative professor comes along to present this case to the administration with a lot of support, I think it’s safe to say this won’t be happening anytime soon.

It’s unfortunate too, because music is an incredibly powerful tool, and I genuinely believe in its ability to ease stress and improve focus. Whether or not that can be applied to a classroom setting has yet to be determined. But alas, at least students can still do homework to sweet sounds.

Taylor Schlacter is a Collegian columnist. He can be reached at tschlact@student.umass.edu.

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