January 28, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

MASSPIRG urges McDonalds to stop purchasing meat raised with antibiotics -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

How to avoid, treat and prevent Computer Vision Syndrome as a college student. -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Narendra Modi and the US forge strengthening ties -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

UMass receives research honor from the Carnegie Foundation -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Islamophobia is a form of racism that needs to be stopped -

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Björk gets personal on breakup album, ‘Vulnicura’ -

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UMass Dining nominated for Seafood Champion Award -

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Why UMass basketball isn’t a good brand of basketball -

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BLOG: Joseph Widmar commits to UMass hockey -

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BLOG: New York Jets name Marcel Shipp new running backs coach -

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A bond over basketball: Trey Davis and Zach Coleman’s friendship continues to grow at UMass -

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Inside the Park with Marky Mark: January 27, 2015 -

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Panda Bear remains confident, even in the face of ‘The Grim Reaper’ -

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Why I want to be a teacher -

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Men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams wrap up third-place finishes at Dartmouth Invitational -

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UMass’ College of Education to train Pakistani higher education administrators -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Hao Luong shines for UMass men’s swimming and diving on Senior Day, prepares for end of college career -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Police Log: Friday, Jan. 23, 2015 to Monday, Jan. 26, 2015 -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Rachel Hilliard, Heather MacLean highlight solid performance from UMass women’s track and field -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Hockey East: Eichel’s overtime goal pushes Boston University past Vermont -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

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The Zodiac: The Stars Behind the Sun

Courtesy of Addison Wesley-Longman

This semester, I jumped on the opportunity to take a fascinating class called “Astronomy 100: Exploring the Universe”. Not only is my mind being blown about our massively insignificant size in comparison to the rest of the universe, but by other interesting tidbits of information that are a bit closer to home: the night sky.

What’s considered most popular in night sky lore is the Zodiac. Though astrology primarily deals with how one’s sign affects their day’s path, astronomy does have a hand in the scientific portion of the Zodiac. No, it has nothing to do with the gravitational significance of one’s sign. Turns out, the stars an individual is born under have no gravitational effect at all upon said individual. The doctor who delivered them has more gravitational significance than the stars overhead on their birthday.

Where astronomy actually comes into play is in the position of the stars during the time of year. The names of the signs—Capricorn, Leo, Virgo, Scorpio, Libra, etc.—are names of constellations that exist in the Earth’s celestial sphere along the ecliptic. For clarification purposes, Earth’s celestial sphere is the expanse of celestial objects (stars, planets, satellites, etc.) that one can see from the Earth’s surface, and the ecliptic is Earth’s orbit around the Sun translated onto the celestial sphere.  In order to make the concept easier to understand, refer to the picture that accompanies this blog.

I know what you’re thinking: “Oh, so this means that if I’m a Virgo, the constellation must’ve been in the sky the night I was born!”  That’s not the case.  In fact, it’s opposite the case: when someone is born a Virgo, the constellation depicting that sign is actually behind the Sun. The constellation will appear in the night sky roughly six months after your birthday.  Seems kind of twisted, doesn’t it?

What’s even more twisted is the fact that there is another sign added to the Zodiac between Scorpio and Sagittarius, called Orphiuchus, making the Zodiac not twelve but thirteen signs.  If you’re interested in astrology, check out the new partition dates for your sign to see if you have changed.  Don’t worry, though, if you have the new sign doesn’t get incorporated into birthdays before 2011.  So, be on the lookout for the birthdays of younger siblings, and perhaps your own future children; they might be Orphiuchuses.

Eliza Mitchell can be reached for comment at elizam@student.umass.edu

Comments
4 Responses to “The Zodiac: The Stars Behind the Sun”
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  2. I do consider all the ideas you have introduced for your post. They are very convincing and will definitely work. Nonetheless, the posts are too brief for starters. Could you please prolong them a little from next time? Thank you for the post.

  3. peadar oceallaigh says:

    Hey very interesting article Eliza.

    I am writing an ‘ebook’ if i wanted to use the sun in the constellations image as you have done how would i go about it.

    You do not have to publish this comment and can reply to my email above.

    keep up the good work and maybe we are not the sign we thought we were with those characteristic’s !

    Kind Regards

    Peadar OCeallaigh

  4. shauna switzer says:

    You are misrepresenting astrology and being light and flippant about a complicated trend in so-called ” New Age” of astrology. Realize that you just took a 100 course and you really know very little about you are talking about.

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