March 4, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

Meet the 2015 SGA spring election candidates -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Years of dedication lead to breakout senior campaign for Zack LaRue -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Five simple steps to get your college diet on track -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Students head to State House, push for more public higher education funding -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Gabriel Schmitt hopes to improve UMass health services as student trustee -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Barrett/Barbosa ‘ready on day one’ -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

An outsider to the SGA, student trustee candidate Nicholas Vigneau says he brings a fresh perspective to the position -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Kristi Sefanoni pleased with UMass softball’s start to season -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Outsider candidates Rocco Giordano and Dhananjay (Danny) Mirlay Srinivas intent on shoring up student-administration relationship, getting more voices heard -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

UMass tennis wins its first conference match in weekend split -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Minutewomen excel despite injuries, Minutemen gain experience -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

SGA election reforms address some, but not all concerns -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Emily O’Neil hopes to increase diversity and improve Title IX training as student trustee -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

The next journalist under fire -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Letter: A call for action and cooperation -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Student trustee candidate Kabir Thatte looks to create his own path as a UMass legacy student within SGA -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Police Log: Friday, Feb. 27 to Sunday, March 1, 2015 -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Kelly, Gay to focus on transparency, accessibility and sexual assault training -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Easy breathing tricks to de-stress during midterms -

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Lack of transparency from Elections Commission endangers spring ballot -

Monday, March 2, 2015

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Trayvon and Jason

Imagine going to the corner store for a snack, and getting accosted on the way home by a man with a gun who chases you down, attacks you and ultimately shoots you in the chest and leaves you to die.  Then imagine that, when the cops arrive, multiple eye witnesses describe the incident, but no forensic analysis of the scene is performed and the shooter is let go because he claims self defense.

Now imagine that you are a young black male and try again (my apologies to the young black males reading this).

The shame of the Trayvon Martin incident is not only that it happened, but that it happens too often. By ‘it,’ I mean a black male is singled out because of race, attacked and then law enforcement officials fail to make arrests or pursue appropriate prosecution.

Let us remember that the UMass Amherst campus has a classic example in its recent history.  In 2008, Jason Vassell, an African American UMass student in good standing, was sitting in his dorm room minding his own business when two drunk white men visiting campus saw him through his dorm window.  They shouted racial slurs, broke his dorm room window and challenged him to a come out and fight.  When Jason called a friend for help, the attackers gained entrance to the dorm and punched Jason in the face, breaking his nose and causing a concussion, and proceeded to chase him around the entrance area.  Jason warned them to back off and declared he had a knife, and after they attacked him, Jason defended himself with his weapon.

What did the cops do?  They figured it was a drug crime, let the white men go and charged Jason with attempted murder.  Two and a half years later, after an uproar from the community and several legal rulings in Jason’s favor, the prosecutor finally dropped all charges. Only one of the two white attackers was ever charged, and he was convicted of simple assault.

How is this like Trayvon Martin? A black guy minding his own business is attacked by a white guy looking for trouble, no charges are filed. Miscarriage of justice? You decide.

Don’t think these things only happen in some parts of the country.  They happen all around us and we all should suffer the shame of it and work much harder to fix it.

Randy Phillis

Professor of Biology

Comments
One Response to “Trayvon and Jason”
  1. R-R-R-R-randy says:

    The man in Trevon identifies as Hispanic, not white. Why are people assuming someone racist is Caucasian (not white) when the individual registers as something else.

    On another note the Vassal case was far more controversial than you give it. Why would two Caucasian men choose that room to randomly break into when they could have jumped any African American in the street? Wouldn’t it be easier to wait outside a dorm than go through a window designed to keep people out or suicidal students in? Even if they were that drunk and that angry it is highly, highly unlikely and illogical for them to pursuit Vassal because he was African American unless he already knew them from a prior encounter or was not as innocent as thought…

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