Scrolling Headlines:

UMass women’s basketball handles Duquesne at home -

January 16, 2017

UMass men’s basketball’s late comeback falls short after blowing 15-point first-half lead -

January 15, 2017

UMass hockey outlasted at home against No. 6 UMass Lowell -

January 14, 2017

Hailey Leidel hits second buzzer beater of the season to give UMass women’s basketball win over Davidson -

January 13, 2017

UMass football hosts Maine at Fenway Park in 2017 -

January 12, 2017

UMass men’s basketball snaps losing streak and upsets Dayton Wednesday night at Mullins Center -

January 11, 2017

UMass women’s track and field takes second at Dartmouth Relays -

January 10, 2017

UMass hockey falls to No. 5 Boston University at Frozen Fenway -

January 8, 2017

UMass professor to make third appearance on ‘Jeopardy!’ -

January 8, 2017

UMass women’s basketball suffers brutal loss on road against Saint Joseph’s -

January 7, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops thirds straight, falls to VCU 81-64 -

January 7, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops tightly-contested conference matchup against George Mason Wednesday night -

January 4, 2017

Late-game defense preserves UMass women’s basketball’s win against rival Rhode Island -

January 4, 2017

AIC shuts out UMass hockey 3-0 at Mullins Center -

January 4, 2017

UMass professor to appear as contestant on ‘Jeopardy!’ Thursday night -

January 4, 2017

Penalties plague UMass hockey in Mariucci Classic championship game -

January 2, 2017

UMass men’s basketball falls in A-10 opener to St. Bonaventure and its veteran backcourt -

December 30, 2016

UMass woman’s basketball ends FIU Holiday Classic with 65-47 loss to Drexel -

December 29, 2016

UMass men’s basketball finishes non-conference schedule strong with win over Georgia State -

December 28, 2016

Brett Boeing joins UMass hockey for second half of season -

December 28, 2016

Review of Ben Gibbard’s “Former Lives”

Jeremy M Farmer/Flickr

Indie rock’s golden child Ben Gibbard has released his first proper solo album, titled “Former Lives.” After 15 years of repackaging the same sound through a series of strikingly similar Death Cab for Cutie albums, Gibbard is finally branching out. “Former Lives” proves that the melancholy singer is more than just a one trick pony.

The album is a high-quality collection of poppy emo tracks. Though this may not sound like anything new for Gibbard, “Former Lives” is truly the most interesting thing to come out of his musical career in nearly a decade.

Gibbard’s sound as a solo artist is not hugely different from Death Cab’s. In fact, he could have easily released “Former Lives” under his band’s name instead of his own. Still, the record illuminates an evolution in Gibbard’s songwriting – and Gibbard has not made this kind of progress on any album since Death Cab for Cutie’s “Transantlanticism.”

One thing made clear by “Former Lives” is the amount of influence Gibbard has absorbed from some early pioneers of emo music. Many of the songs on “Former Lives” seem to borrow elements from the late Elliott Smith, whose former collaborator Aaron Espinoza helped produce the album. Smith’s ghost emerges right away on tracks like “Dream Song” and “Lily,” due mostly to Gibbard’s similar guitar style.

Infectiously catchy pop melodies carry listeners through tracks like “Teardrop Windows” and “Oh, Woe” – both songs that are reminiscent of new-wave artists like The Smiths. Gibbard’s vocal melodies are simultaneously bright and somber, both alive and dead. Morrissey himself would be proud.

Not every track on “Former Lives” helps Gibbard break new ground, however. “Bigger Than Love,” which features guest vocals from Aimee Mann, could be seamlessly transplanted to any recent Death Cab for Cutie release. The song is characterized by Gibbard’s classic dull, murky sound and coated with that signature brand of heartwarming sentimentality Death Cab fans know and love.

“Lady Adelaide” is another track on “Former Lives” that highly resembles past Death Cab releases. The guitar style is typical of Gibbard’s ballads, bearing some resemblance to songs like “A Lack of Color.” Fortunately, “Lady Adelaide” is not burdened by these similarities. Instead, the rich poetry and clever composition make this track a highlight of the album.

Unlike “Bigger Than Love” and “Lady Adelaide,” tracks like “Something’s Rattling” and “Broken Yoke in Western Sky” give Gibbard an opportunity to strongly diverge from what has become his typical sound. “Something’s Rattling” sways delicately, boldly walking on the outskirts of mariachi. “Broken Yoke” provides some country twang with an airy Hawaiian guitar. These new elements to Gibbard’s songwriting style are beautifully executed and wonderfully refreshing.

Sadly, “Duncan, Where Have You Gone?” is a song so bland it could easily turn listeners off to what the rest of the album has to offer. The track is obnoxiously soothing and frustratingly intangible.  It is lucky that “Duncan” – arguably Gibbard’s worst song to date – was inconspicuously tucked away in the middle of the record, where it will be easily lost and inevitably forgotten.

Aside from the monstrosity that is “Duncan,” “Former Lives” is a substantial and refreshing release. Nearly every song on the album is persistently catchy, without falling into the superficiality that pervades so much of today’s popular music.

The record closes with a short ballad called “I’m Building a Fire.” Heavy white noise envelops the lo-fi recording, relinquishing some of Gibbard’s waning indie cred. Soft, sweeping guitar chords emerge from the static like a seed beginning to sprout. With any luck, “Former Lives” will represent the beginning of a bold new chapter in Ben Gibbard’s career as a songwriter.

Gibbard will perform at the Somerville Theatre in Somerville. on Nov. 4.

Chris Trubac can be reached at ctrubac@student.umass.edu.

 

Leave A Comment