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Drinks made famous by literary stalwarts

Flickr/Pedro Moura Pinheiro

It is no secret that some of our favorite famous authors were also famous drinkers. While there is no need to take the Ernest Hemingway approach to writing (his mantra was “Write drunk; edit sober”), here’s a list of cocktails inspired by the greatest literary minds and their favorite beverages.

 

The Old Man on a Beach

Famous for his time in the tropical landscapes of Cuba and Key West, Hemingway did some of his best work sipping refreshing cocktails on the shore. In a twist on a classic drink named after Hemingway himself, try adding grapefruit soda to citrus or lemonade flavored vodka. Serve in a martini glass with some huevos rancheros, light a cigar and crack open a copy of “The Old Man and the Sea.”

 

A Bloody Good Time

Edgar Allen Poe is known for his horrifically gory tales of murder and malice. In an ode to this fantastical man and his love of all things gruesome, try this themed cocktail. Start with cherry Rubinoff and then add cranberry juice and cola in equal parts to taste. Be carefeul not to spill this bloody mess on you or people will think you’re still playing Humans vs. Zombies.

 

Under The Host

Dorothy Parker, famous for her biting wit, dark humor and ‘thirst’ for life, enjoyed the simplicity and class of a dry martini. Actually, she enjoyed the class of two martinis at most because after four she often found herself under her host. In honor of Parker’s flirtatiousness, make yourself a Flirtini. Combine equal parts pineapple juice and vodka then add a splash of champagne or Sprite and go find that host of yours.

Gatsby’s Gin

F. Scott Fitzgerald was known for being quite the lightweight when it came to drinking, but that only encouraged the man’s love of libations. Fitzgerald’s favorite liquor was gin because he believed it couldn’t be smelled on the breath. A traditional man, he enjoyed his gin with one part lime juice and one part soda water. Serve in a highball glass with a lime wedge. Anyone else see the connection between the green lime and the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock in “The Great Gatsby”?

All Day Long

Carson McCullers began her day with breakfast and a beer. Brushing your teeth with a bottle of Jack, Ke$ha, is nothing in comparison to McCullers’ daily routine. After her beer, McCullers would fill a thermos full of hot tea and sherry and call it her “Sonnie Boy” until the work day was done and then would finish her night with a nightcap of a Long Island Iced Tea or a cleansing beer. She brought day drinking to a whole new level. McCullers’ drink of choice was not just one drink, but instead a routine starting at sunrise.

Allie Connell can be reached at aconn0@student.umass.edu.

 

Comments
One Response to “Drinks made famous by literary stalwarts”
  1. Brian Canova says:

    No shout out to Hank Moody and his whiskey?

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