Scrolling Headlines:

‘Stopping Genocide and Mass Atrocities by Stopping the War Profiteers’ talk at UMass -

February 19, 2017

UMass hockey falls to No. 6 UMass Lowell for third time this season -

February 18, 2017

UMass hockey breakdown in final minutes of the second period on route to 5-2 loss to UMass Lowell -

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Notebook: Jack Gibbs stars as UMass men’s basketball team drops game to Davidson Saturday -

February 18, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops another close game, falls to Davidson Saturday afternoon -

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Local blogger Larry Kelley dies in car crash, remembered by community -

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REPORT: UMass football to name Ed Pinkham as next defensive coordinator -

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NPR Education Correspondent Eric Westervelt talks on future of education -

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Faculty of journalism department discusses failures of journalism during Trump era -

February 16, 2017

UMass hockey prepares for third and final match-up against No. 6 UMass Lowell on Saturday -

February 16, 2017

Panelists hold discussion on embodying global coalitions -

February 16, 2017

Journalist speaks on criminalization of youth in the United States -

February 16, 2017

UMass women’s lacrosse heads to Florida in search of first win of 2017 -

February 16, 2017

UMass men’s lacrosse looks to get offense back on track against Ohio State -

February 16, 2017

Duquesne stomps UMass men’s basketball 96-66 in Pittsburgh -

February 16, 2017

UMass softball focuses on mental approach ahead of Madeira Beach Invitational -

February 16, 2017

UMass women’s basketball drops eighth straight in loss at Richmond -

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‘50 Shades Darker’ steams up all windows in the nation -

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’20th Century Women’ is a love letter to women across generations -

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Speakers endorse public education

Maria Uminski/Collegian

When Jessica He was 17, she knew that she wanted to attend a private college in the city. She visited College Board’s website and applied to schools like Boston College, Boston University and Northeastern University.

“They looked fabulous online,” she said.

But after visiting the schools, she had a change of heart.

“When I took the tours, they were really intimidating, and it was a huge slap in the face for me,” she said. “I didn’t know where my school stopped and the city began.”

He talked of her experience at an event called “GO PUBLIC!” at the Ralph C. Mahar Regional High School in Orange. The event promoted public state universities to the community, focusing on high school students and their parents.

Student and faculty speakers from Westfield State University, Mount Wachusett Community College, Greenfield Community College and the University of Massachusetts were also in attendance.

He, a public health major with four minors in psychology, sociology, anthropology and kinesiology, represented UMass at the event.

Also from UMass was Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy, who talked about the University’s “world class” research experience for first year students and emphasized the school’s breadth of choices.

“If you decide you want to do something else, you can switch,” he said.

Robin Bowen, vice president of Academic Affairs at Fitchburg State University who has worked at a range of private colleges and large universities, emphasized the quality of public schools, like UMass.

“I really do not see much difference between a public institution and a private institution,” she said.

Greenfield Community College President Dr. Robert L. Pura talked about the relationship between students and faculty at GCC.

“All of our business faculty say we don’t want students making appointments. We want to build offices where we’re right there where we’re available to our students,” Pura said.

Mount Wachusett Community College President Dr. Daniel Asquino also focused on students’ interactions with faculty.

“I see beautiful facilities, but it is not about bricks and mortar,” he said. “I would like you to see the faculty, the staff, and the people, who every single day engage our students.”

Michael Lewis, 53, studied at GCC and talked about his past as a student before attending the college.

“I didn’t like high school,” he said. “I was a social outcast growing up as one of the few black children in a mostly white town.”

Lewis viewed classes at GCC as opportunities.

“You have a chance to reach for the stars,” he said. “You have a chance to find out who and what you are, and what you do.”

Amber McHale talked about her experience at MWCC. She enrolled in a program called “Gateway to College” in which she earned college credits while still attending high school at Mahar. After graduating in May 2011, she enrolled at MWCC to become a technician.

Another speaker, Stephanie Close, was a first generation college student at WSU. At first she had no idea what she wanted to do, and saw the liberal arts college as a way to find out. At Westfield State, she discovered her passion for history, political science and public service. Close got involved in the student government and she plans on running for office.

“It changed my life,” she said.

At the beginning of the event, State Sen. Stephen Brewer encouraged all students to attend college.

“The promise of America is to make sure that you have opportunity, no matter how rich or how poor, or how hard working,” he said. “If you have the drive or initiative to be what you want to be in this world, we want to make sure that you have that opportunity.”

Mary Reines can be reached at mreines@student.umass.edu.

 

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