Scrolling Headlines:

Three thefts in Fine Arts Center over past week -

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Talk on women’s resistance to Brazilian military dictatorship held at the Old Chapel -

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Engstrom and MacLean lead UMass cross country at Battle in Beantown -

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The anti-Semitism of the Suarez talk is not the way to discuss the Israeli-/Palestinian conflict -

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No, fascists are not the same as those who oppose them -

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Political factions oppose each other like passionate sports fans -

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Emmy’s 2017 Red Carpet fashion recap: who, what, WEAR -

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We all scream for vegan ice cream -

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UMass women’s soccer takes complete control in 3-1 win vs. Davidson -

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Shaughnessy Naughton speaks on STEM professionals in politics -

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ESPN author and journalist talks sports and mental health at UMass -

September 25, 2017

UMass men’s soccer remains unbeaten at home -

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Minutewomen split Pennsylvania trip -

September 25, 2017

Kozlowski’s minutes limited for second straight game in loss versus Fordham -

September 25, 2017

Late penalty-kick goal not enough vs. Rams -

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UMass football nearly upends Tennessee Saturday in 17-13 loss -

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A conversation with the Pixies’ Joey Santiago -

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Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything

MCT

Facebook frequently updates its site with new formats, layouts and applications, often triggering negative backlash from users. But over the last few day, it’s the users who have been updating their statuses to inform the owners of Facebook with demands of their own by using a copy and pasted status claiming copyright ownership over one’s own information, including written posts, photos and videos.

But, these statues don’t copyright users information. Instead, they are a hoax.

The Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times and Washington Post all reported Monday that the recent trend on Facebook, where users post messages saying that because of the new Facebook policy announced last week users must write a message claiming their material as copyrighted in order to keep Facebook from owning it, is incorrect and ineffective.

The popularly posted message does not change any of Facebook’s terms and conditions and incorrectly warns that “if you do not publish a statement [claiming your content as your own] at least once you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates.”

However, the new Facebook policy does not deal with copyright issues, as a user’s copyright rights are outlined in the terms and conditions every user agrees to before joining. These terms and conditions state a user’s content is their own, but that they are licensing it to Facebook for advertising and sharing with the user’s friends, according to the Huffington Post.

Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes told the Huffington Post that users have power over their own content without posting a status about it.

“As outlined in our terms, the people who use Facebook own all of the content and information they post on Facebook, and they can control how it is shared through their privacy and application settings. Under our terms, you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings,” he said.

Facebook has recently changed their policy for new users, giving them specific instructions on privacy policy and rules about third-party web sites. Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Erin Egan told the Washington Post that the company is “committed to making sure people understand how to control what they share and with whom” as they “strive to highlight the many resources and tools we offer to help people control their information on Facebook.”

Similar hoaxes have occurred before, as recently as June, where Facebook has posted on their own wall that they are untrue, according to the Huffington Post.

Sam Hayes can be reached at sdhayes@student.umass.edu.

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One Response to “Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything”
  1. Nice post really awesome 😀

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