September 19, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Ed Davis report leaves nobody blameless -

Friday, September 19, 2014

White House starts public awareness drive to prevent sexual attacks on campus -

Friday, September 19, 2014

Work already underway for SGA speaker Sïonan Barrett -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

UMass in for a challenge against Penn State, QB Hackenberg -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Nostalgia and angst abound in ‘Palo Alto’ -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Want student power? End the SGA -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

UMass football kicking situation still undecided, looking forward to opportunity to play at Beaver Stadium -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Lorenzo Woodley finds opportunity after getting lost in the shuffle -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Millennials’ votes can make a difference in all elections -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

UMass faculty member Bonnie Strickland recognized for work in psychology -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

UMass women’s soccer suffers major set back with injury to co-captain Jackie Bruno -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

UMass men’s soccer returns home looking for season’s first win -

Thursday, September 18, 2014

UMass professor Elizabeth Chilton to speak in Madrid and Paris about importance of heritage studies -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

UMass club rugby hopes to continue momentum despite opening loss -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Bizarre foods eaten worldwide -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

US should spend more on space -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Walking through a week of practice with UMass field hockey -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

UMass receives $37.5 million for environmental and sustainability initiatives -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Irish coffee recipe -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

To fight ISIS, US must understand them, not chalk up actions to pure evil -

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything

MCT

Facebook frequently updates its site with new formats, layouts and applications, often triggering negative backlash from users. But over the last few day, it’s the users who have been updating their statuses to inform the owners of Facebook with demands of their own by using a copy and pasted status claiming copyright ownership over one’s own information, including written posts, photos and videos.

But, these statues don’t copyright users information. Instead, they are a hoax.

The Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times and Washington Post all reported Monday that the recent trend on Facebook, where users post messages saying that because of the new Facebook policy announced last week users must write a message claiming their material as copyrighted in order to keep Facebook from owning it, is incorrect and ineffective.

The popularly posted message does not change any of Facebook’s terms and conditions and incorrectly warns that “if you do not publish a statement [claiming your content as your own] at least once you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates.”

However, the new Facebook policy does not deal with copyright issues, as a user’s copyright rights are outlined in the terms and conditions every user agrees to before joining. These terms and conditions state a user’s content is their own, but that they are licensing it to Facebook for advertising and sharing with the user’s friends, according to the Huffington Post.

Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes told the Huffington Post that users have power over their own content without posting a status about it.

“As outlined in our terms, the people who use Facebook own all of the content and information they post on Facebook, and they can control how it is shared through their privacy and application settings. Under our terms, you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings,” he said.

Facebook has recently changed their policy for new users, giving them specific instructions on privacy policy and rules about third-party web sites. Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Erin Egan told the Washington Post that the company is “committed to making sure people understand how to control what they share and with whom” as they “strive to highlight the many resources and tools we offer to help people control their information on Facebook.”

Similar hoaxes have occurred before, as recently as June, where Facebook has posted on their own wall that they are untrue, according to the Huffington Post.

Sam Hayes can be reached at sdhayes@student.umass.edu.

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One Response to “Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything”
  1. Nice post really awesome :D

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