Scrolling Headlines:

Jabarie Hinds gives UMass men’s basketball a lift in upset win over VCU -

February 11, 2016

UMass men’s basketball overcomes late VCU surge in 69-63 win -

February 11, 2016

Offensive vandalism found in Integrated Learning Center -

February 11, 2016

Nominations for SGA elections will remain open until Feb. 19 -

February 11, 2016

SGA, MassPIRG work together on open source textbook initiative -

February 11, 2016

Civil rights activist Cornel West to speak at Smith College -

February 11, 2016

Uncertainties surround UMass men’s lacrosse as it kicks off season against Army -

February 11, 2016

New face, same old ‘Havoc’: UMass basketball ready to face familiar style of play against VCU -

February 11, 2016

UMass women’s lacrosse begins season with high expectations, seeking eighth straight A-10 championship -

February 11, 2016

UMass hockey players react to news of next year’s trip to Belfast -

February 11, 2016

UMass women’s basketball falls to La Salle, drops 11th straight game -

February 11, 2016

‘Havoc’ returns to Mullins Center as UMass men’s basketball prepares for VCU -

February 11, 2016

Bernie Sanders already making history as Jewish candidate -

February 11, 2016

Super Bowl is an impressive feat of entertainment -

February 11, 2016

‘The Hateful Eight’ shows Quentin Tarantino losing his edge -

February 11, 2016

Tips and travel hacks for a fun spring break -

February 11, 2016

MassPIRG forum discusses problem of antibiotic resistance -

February 10, 2016

First inside look at the John Francis Kennedy Champions Center -

February 10, 2016

UMass tennis rallies past St. Johns to give Red Storm first loss of season -

February 10, 2016

UMass community grieves for beloved friend and mentor James Tilley -

February 10, 2016

Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything

MCT

Facebook frequently updates its site with new formats, layouts and applications, often triggering negative backlash from users. But over the last few day, it’s the users who have been updating their statuses to inform the owners of Facebook with demands of their own by using a copy and pasted status claiming copyright ownership over one’s own information, including written posts, photos and videos.

But, these statues don’t copyright users information. Instead, they are a hoax.

The Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times and Washington Post all reported Monday that the recent trend on Facebook, where users post messages saying that because of the new Facebook policy announced last week users must write a message claiming their material as copyrighted in order to keep Facebook from owning it, is incorrect and ineffective.

The popularly posted message does not change any of Facebook’s terms and conditions and incorrectly warns that “if you do not publish a statement [claiming your content as your own] at least once you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates.”

However, the new Facebook policy does not deal with copyright issues, as a user’s copyright rights are outlined in the terms and conditions every user agrees to before joining. These terms and conditions state a user’s content is their own, but that they are licensing it to Facebook for advertising and sharing with the user’s friends, according to the Huffington Post.

Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes told the Huffington Post that users have power over their own content without posting a status about it.

“As outlined in our terms, the people who use Facebook own all of the content and information they post on Facebook, and they can control how it is shared through their privacy and application settings. Under our terms, you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings,” he said.

Facebook has recently changed their policy for new users, giving them specific instructions on privacy policy and rules about third-party web sites. Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Erin Egan told the Washington Post that the company is “committed to making sure people understand how to control what they share and with whom” as they “strive to highlight the many resources and tools we offer to help people control their information on Facebook.”

Similar hoaxes have occurred before, as recently as June, where Facebook has posted on their own wall that they are untrue, according to the Huffington Post.

Sam Hayes can be reached at sdhayes@student.umass.edu.

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One Response to “Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything”
  1. Nice post really awesome 😀

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