Scrolling Headlines:

Neil deGrasse Tyson to deliver keynote speech at 2015 UMass Commencement -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Emmanuel T. Bile Jr. sentenced Wednesday morning for involvement in 2012 gang rape -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Congressman Jim McGovern visits UMass for event hosted by UMass Democrats -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

UMass baseball set to renew rivalry with Boston College -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Notebook: UMass football more comfortable this time around in spring practice -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

‘Bloodborne’ is a perfectly twisted video game experience -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

The overwhelmed and cynical public remains uninformed on politics -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

SGA Senator hopes to educate students on Campus Pulse -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Outdoor season generates excitement for men’s, women’s track and field -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Brendan Hegarty continuing to contribute for UMass lacrosse -

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Route 9 Diner closes as attorney general files discrimination complaint -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

UMass tight end Jean Sifrin performs in front of NFL scouts at Pro Day -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Sisters on the Runway successfully hosts benefit fashion show for Safe Passage -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

‘Hurry sickness’ is actually wasting our time -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Angela Davis condemns the prison industrial complex in campus talk -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

UMass softball’s home opener postponed due to unplayable field conditions -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Kickin’ Back Dance Crew looks to emerge as its own dance club -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Doing good while looking good: Fashion show raises domestic violence awareness -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Ryan Moloney pitching with confidence for UMass baseball -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Police Log: Friday, March 27 to Sunday, March 29, 2015 -

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Advertisement

Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything

MCT

Facebook frequently updates its site with new formats, layouts and applications, often triggering negative backlash from users. But over the last few day, it’s the users who have been updating their statuses to inform the owners of Facebook with demands of their own by using a copy and pasted status claiming copyright ownership over one’s own information, including written posts, photos and videos.

But, these statues don’t copyright users information. Instead, they are a hoax.

The Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times and Washington Post all reported Monday that the recent trend on Facebook, where users post messages saying that because of the new Facebook policy announced last week users must write a message claiming their material as copyrighted in order to keep Facebook from owning it, is incorrect and ineffective.

The popularly posted message does not change any of Facebook’s terms and conditions and incorrectly warns that “if you do not publish a statement [claiming your content as your own] at least once you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates.”

However, the new Facebook policy does not deal with copyright issues, as a user’s copyright rights are outlined in the terms and conditions every user agrees to before joining. These terms and conditions state a user’s content is their own, but that they are licensing it to Facebook for advertising and sharing with the user’s friends, according to the Huffington Post.

Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes told the Huffington Post that users have power over their own content without posting a status about it.

“As outlined in our terms, the people who use Facebook own all of the content and information they post on Facebook, and they can control how it is shared through their privacy and application settings. Under our terms, you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings,” he said.

Facebook has recently changed their policy for new users, giving them specific instructions on privacy policy and rules about third-party web sites. Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Erin Egan told the Washington Post that the company is “committed to making sure people understand how to control what they share and with whom” as they “strive to highlight the many resources and tools we offer to help people control their information on Facebook.”

Similar hoaxes have occurred before, as recently as June, where Facebook has posted on their own wall that they are untrue, according to the Huffington Post.

Sam Hayes can be reached at sdhayes@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything”
  1. Nice post really awesome :D

Leave A Comment