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Letter: Deflate-Gate, where’s the air? -

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Derrick Gordon announces he will transfer to Seton Hall -

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Stop ignoring your white privilege -

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Letter: Wall is a regression towards racial inequality -

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UMass falls to Fairfield in extra innings in final home game -

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UMass basketball recruit Marcquise Reed chooses Clemson -

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UMass baseball drops Senior Day rubber match against URI -

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UMass women’s lacrosse falls in second round of NCAA tournament against top-seeded Maryland -

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: ‘It’s okay not to know’ -

Friday, May 8, 2015

Defense, Eipp’s five goals lead UMass women’s lacrosse past Jacksonville in NCAA tournament -

Friday, May 8, 2015

Quianna Diaz-Patterson closes book on historic senior season, successful career for UMass softball -

Friday, May 8, 2015

Advertisement

Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything

MCT

Facebook frequently updates its site with new formats, layouts and applications, often triggering negative backlash from users. But over the last few day, it’s the users who have been updating their statuses to inform the owners of Facebook with demands of their own by using a copy and pasted status claiming copyright ownership over one’s own information, including written posts, photos and videos.

But, these statues don’t copyright users information. Instead, they are a hoax.

The Huffington Post, Los Angeles Times and Washington Post all reported Monday that the recent trend on Facebook, where users post messages saying that because of the new Facebook policy announced last week users must write a message claiming their material as copyrighted in order to keep Facebook from owning it, is incorrect and ineffective.

The popularly posted message does not change any of Facebook’s terms and conditions and incorrectly warns that “if you do not publish a statement [claiming your content as your own] at least once you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates.”

However, the new Facebook policy does not deal with copyright issues, as a user’s copyright rights are outlined in the terms and conditions every user agrees to before joining. These terms and conditions state a user’s content is their own, but that they are licensing it to Facebook for advertising and sharing with the user’s friends, according to the Huffington Post.

Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes told the Huffington Post that users have power over their own content without posting a status about it.

“As outlined in our terms, the people who use Facebook own all of the content and information they post on Facebook, and they can control how it is shared through their privacy and application settings. Under our terms, you grant Facebook permission to use, distribute, and share the things you post, subject to the terms and applicable privacy settings,” he said.

Facebook has recently changed their policy for new users, giving them specific instructions on privacy policy and rules about third-party web sites. Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Erin Egan told the Washington Post that the company is “committed to making sure people understand how to control what they share and with whom” as they “strive to highlight the many resources and tools we offer to help people control their information on Facebook.”

Similar hoaxes have occurred before, as recently as June, where Facebook has posted on their own wall that they are untrue, according to the Huffington Post.

Sam Hayes can be reached at sdhayes@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “Facebook privacy disclaimer does not protect anything”
  1. Nice post really awesome 😀

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