January 26, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

Paranormal Research Society seeks to uncover the truth about the supernatural -

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UMass tops Merrimack 4-1 to cap off successful weekend series -

Monday, January 26, 2015

‘Broad City’s’ second season off to a wickedly funny start -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Students respond to Obama’s State of the Union address -

Monday, January 26, 2015

St. Bonaventure earns tight victory, VCU clinches 11th straight win in Atlantic 10 men’s basketball action -

Monday, January 26, 2015

An open letter to the people who were kind when I was struggling -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass club hockey salvages weekend with tie against NYU on Saturday -

Monday, January 26, 2015

2015 Winter TCA’s announce bevy of show returns and new releases -

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Brilliant online film archives for cinema lovers -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass men’s and women’s track and field teams see mixed results in Joe Donahue Indoor Games -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Steve Mastalerz, defense delivers for UMass hockey -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass online graduate programs climb U.S. News & World Report rankings -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Front to Back: Week of Jan. 25, 2015 -

Sunday, January 25, 2015

BLOG: UMass football receives seven verbal commitments -

Sunday, January 25, 2015

UMass plans to fail again with Super Bowl guest policy -

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Special teams play fuels late UMass rally, forces tie -

Saturday, January 24, 2015

BLOG: UMass hires Mark Michaels as special teams coordinator, outside linebackers coach -

Friday, January 23, 2015

Former Tibetan political prisoner overcomes odds in Tibet and the US -

Thursday, January 22, 2015

UMass basketball falls flat in loss to St. Joe’s -

Thursday, January 22, 2015

‘Selma’ resonates with the here and now -

Thursday, January 22, 2015

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Elevator etiquette

Courtesy of UMass.edu

Floor fourteen going up. Floor seventeen going up. Floor two going up. Floor–wait a minute. Floor two going up? Alright, we’ve all had to go to at least one of the twenty six floors of the W.E.B Du Bois library at some point; maybe for research, maybe you’re craving a coffee from the procrastination station, or maybe you just want an overlooking view of the campus. Whatever the reason, we’ve all been there. Each day there are people going to floors high up in the double digits for their library needs. That being said, to the people who take the library elevator to floor two, you better have a broken leg, or a damn good reason for prolonging the 15 other people in the elevator from getting to the floors that they need to go to.

When I need to go to floor 17 or 21 for a research paper that I already don’t want to do, then have to continuously stop from floor to floor, I’m a little annoyed. But when on top of that, some princess believes that she (or he) has the liberty to take the elevator up a more than reasonable walking distance, that’s when I become extremely irritated.

In all seriousness, what are you thinking? There are two sets of stairs in the library, and honestly, it’s not that straining to get a two-flight exercise in. In fact, floor nine and below is elevator no-no territory. This is about more than you just looking like a jerk. It would honestly be more productive to take the stairs for floors two through nine because we all know the elevator takes a while. By the time you actually get in the elevator and get to your floor, you could have already walked up the stairs and finished what you came to do. Additionally, to the people who have refused to take the stairs in the library, you’re actually missing out. There are incredible artistic works on the walls in the breaks on the staircases. For each flight you walk up, you could be exposed to an amazing piece of art. So stop making yourself look like a jerk, get some exercise, and give yourself the experience of a museum. Unless you’re going to a floor with more than one digit, take the freaking stairs. Please, and thank you, from majority of the student body.

Ali Strand can be reached for comment at ahstrand@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “Elevator etiquette”
  1. Kat says:

    This should apply to every building with the elevators, especially the SouthWest High-rises, Lederle GRC, etc! Usually my internal rule for others is the first five floors are walk-able, otherwise elevator (especially when you’re carrying huge books, etc) but when someone gets on the elevator, see’s you’ve pressed floor 17… and then actually press 16 in front of you. WHY

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