April 25, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Bowl Weekend set to be ‘very successful’ -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Win-and-in situation looms for UMass men’s lacrosse against Delaware -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Brewed of the Gods – Dogfish Head Theobroma -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Never again, never forget: Remembering the Armenian genocide -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

No. 11 UMass women’s lacrosse prepares for final two regular season games -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Food of the World: Vietnam -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Indie duo The Both to perform at Pearl Street -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

USDA grants awarded to UMass faculty -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

UMass baseball team heads to Bronx for three-game set vs. Fordham -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Workout on the Quad comes to UMass -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Time to reconsider ‘war on terror’ -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

UMass men’s lacrosse has received solid play from freshmen all year -

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Renowned rabbi discusses the role of religion in American policy -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

UMass baseball haunted by missed opportunities in 8-5 loss -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

‘Transcendence’ a fumbling cautionary tale -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Freedom of speech for campus employees -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

‘Veep’ continues to be one of the smartest comedies around -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

‘Noah’ a sinking ship -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Letter: A response to ‘There is nothing to debate about global warming’ -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Push for punishment equality -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

High-performance computer center opens in Holyoke

The new high-performance computing center in Holyoke was officially opened last month in a collaborative effort between the University of Massachusetts, Boston University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University and Harvard University.

The Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC) is a 90,300 square foot facility housing 10,000 megawatts of power. While it currently only houses 10,000 computers, it will eventually house 20,000.

These computers are to be used for everything from computation modeling of the immune system response to genetics and traffic patterns and weather modeling.

The primary goal of the center is to be able to sift through large quantities of data. But it also creates a partnership between the universities.

“This is the catalyst for collaboration between the five universities. It couldn’t have been done by just one university,” said John Goodhue, executive director of the project.

Four scientific researchers were awarded a $2.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Major Research Instrumentation Program: Chris Hill from MIT, Claudio Rebbi from Boston University, Gene Cooperman from Northeastern University and Prashant Shenoy from UMass.

Claudio said that this facility and this equipment will create a broad new scope for possible research.

“This will give us the possibility to expand research, and give the capability for people to use these tools. A collaboration between these universities would be unthinkable 10 years ago, it’s remarkable,” Claudio said.

Nearly 70 percent of the energy used for the MGHPCC is made from hydroelectric power.

“There are still costs like maintenance operation, support for the computers themselves, and cleaning and cooling expenses, it’s not all that different from maintaining an office building, or a building on campus, but hydroelectric power makes it less expensive,” Goodhue said.

The collaboration between universities also reduces costs for the facility. Prashant said that this facility would have cost too much for a single university to afford to build it.

All of the technical maintenance and support will be done on campus, rather than at the facility to keep it as connected to the universities as it can be.

Costs for maintaining the MGHPCC will be divided among the universities, along with costs of electricity and construction, Goodhue said.

Goodhue said that Holyoke was chosen because it has one of the lowest costs of energy in the state and because it is at a communications crossroads and is easily accessible from highways. He also said that it had low costs for space for building the facility.

Since the MGHPCC is not located on a campus, the space that it would have taken up can be put to other uses, according to Goodhue.

“The campus is for people, this frees up space for universities to do other things with,” he said.

Use of the MGHPCC will be available to all of the UMass campuses.

“All UMass campuses, faculty researchers and students, are included to use this facility,” said Shenoy.

Katherine Clark can be reached at kpclarke@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “High-performance computer center opens in Holyoke”
  1. This is a great movement towards sharing data and ensuring the green movement is pushed through. We should more on developing green strategies like some companies such as Qualified Cleaning Services. It really demonstrates how considerate a company is towards cutting costs and allowing for a company to build up its’ reputation, much like the UMass campuses.

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