April 18, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

John Ashcroft faces criticism during speech -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Student rally in support of Gordon, LGBTQ community -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Thousands gather in Amherst Commons for 23rd Annual Extravaganja -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Sexual violence is not ‘normal’ -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

One year after Boston Marathon bombings, UMass doctor Pierre Rouzier continues passion to help -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Photo Slideshow: UMass United Rally -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Get Yourself Tested at UMass -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass football continues move in new direction in annual Spring Game -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Library labyrinth targets stress -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

There is nothing to debate about global warming -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass hits the road to take on LaSalle -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

No. 11 UMass women’s lacrosse looks to extend winning streak against Richmond -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Southeastern Conference commissioner Mike Slive latest McCormack Executive-in-Residence -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Got a little Irish in you? -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass doctoral student awarded Soros Fellowship -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass Dressage Team discusses the lesser-known sport -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Canelas: Things worth watching in Spring Game 2014 -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

‘The Walking Dead’ finale resurrects a dull season -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Five places to study at UMass -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

UMass tennis team battles injuries as season comes to an end -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

High-performance computer center opens in Holyoke

The new high-performance computing center in Holyoke was officially opened last month in a collaborative effort between the University of Massachusetts, Boston University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University and Harvard University.

The Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC) is a 90,300 square foot facility housing 10,000 megawatts of power. While it currently only houses 10,000 computers, it will eventually house 20,000.

These computers are to be used for everything from computation modeling of the immune system response to genetics and traffic patterns and weather modeling.

The primary goal of the center is to be able to sift through large quantities of data. But it also creates a partnership between the universities.

“This is the catalyst for collaboration between the five universities. It couldn’t have been done by just one university,” said John Goodhue, executive director of the project.

Four scientific researchers were awarded a $2.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Major Research Instrumentation Program: Chris Hill from MIT, Claudio Rebbi from Boston University, Gene Cooperman from Northeastern University and Prashant Shenoy from UMass.

Claudio said that this facility and this equipment will create a broad new scope for possible research.

“This will give us the possibility to expand research, and give the capability for people to use these tools. A collaboration between these universities would be unthinkable 10 years ago, it’s remarkable,” Claudio said.

Nearly 70 percent of the energy used for the MGHPCC is made from hydroelectric power.

“There are still costs like maintenance operation, support for the computers themselves, and cleaning and cooling expenses, it’s not all that different from maintaining an office building, or a building on campus, but hydroelectric power makes it less expensive,” Goodhue said.

The collaboration between universities also reduces costs for the facility. Prashant said that this facility would have cost too much for a single university to afford to build it.

All of the technical maintenance and support will be done on campus, rather than at the facility to keep it as connected to the universities as it can be.

Costs for maintaining the MGHPCC will be divided among the universities, along with costs of electricity and construction, Goodhue said.

Goodhue said that Holyoke was chosen because it has one of the lowest costs of energy in the state and because it is at a communications crossroads and is easily accessible from highways. He also said that it had low costs for space for building the facility.

Since the MGHPCC is not located on a campus, the space that it would have taken up can be put to other uses, according to Goodhue.

“The campus is for people, this frees up space for universities to do other things with,” he said.

Use of the MGHPCC will be available to all of the UMass campuses.

“All UMass campuses, faculty researchers and students, are included to use this facility,” said Shenoy.

Katherine Clark can be reached at kpclarke@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “High-performance computer center opens in Holyoke”
  1. This is a great movement towards sharing data and ensuring the green movement is pushed through. We should more on developing green strategies like some companies such as Qualified Cleaning Services. It really demonstrates how considerate a company is towards cutting costs and allowing for a company to build up its’ reputation, much like the UMass campuses.

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