July 30, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

UMass receives anonymous $10.3 million gift -

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

UMass Football summer coverage 2014 -

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

UMass Rowing finishes NCAA Championships, ends year ranked No. 21 in the nation -

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Two UMass basketball alums to compete for a lofty prize in The Basketball Tournament -

Friday, May 23, 2014

Commencement Photos 2014 -

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Two arrested in relation to series of vandalism -

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Students push for relocation of the Center for Counseling and Psychological Health -

Monday, May 12, 2014

Video: No. 14 UMass WLAX ends season in loss to Loyola (MD) -

Saturday, May 10, 2014

No. 14 UMass women’s lacrosse season ends in loss to Loyola (MD) -

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Sixth inning rally propels UMass past Dayton 7-2 -

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

McMahon, Ferris and McGovern: Not your usual transfer story -

Sunday, May 4, 2014

Women’s lacrosse defeats Richmond 10-6 to win sixth straight A-10 Championship -

Sunday, May 4, 2014

No. 13 UMass women’s lacrosse knocks off Duquesne 16-3 to reach Atlantic 10 finals -

Friday, May 2, 2014

UMass one of 55 schools currently facing investigation over handling of sexual assault cases -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Two thefts reported at library -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Senior Columns 2013-2014 -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

UMass Dining proposes major meal plan changes -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Boston Red Sox 2013 Offseason Tracker: David Ross

MCT

David Ross

Former team: Atlanta Braves

Position: Catcher

Contract: 2-year, $6.2 million

Projected role: Backup catcher

Boston’s signing of Davis Ross, an 11-year veteran, fills one of the team’s less-glaring holes: backup catcher. Ross played the previous four seasons in Atlanta backing up Brian McCann effectively; he accumulated 663 plate appearances and posted a .353 on-base percentage and a .463 slugging percentage. He’ll start the season sharing the catching duties with current Red Sox starter, Jarrod Saltalamacchia. If last year is indicative of anything, Ross probably won’t provide a drastic upgrade from Boston’s backup last year, Kelly Shoppach.

I’m not suggesting that Ross will replicate his 2012 season, but he’s a 35-year-old lifetime backup catcher – his ceiling has come and gone. However, Boston could do much worse than .256/.321/.449 for a backup catcher.

As I said, Ross will likely split time with the switch-hitting Saltalamacchia at catcher. Calling Saltalamacchia a switch-hitter is a bit disingenuous considering that just 13 percent of his plate appearances came from the right side last year. In 2011, 32 percent of his plate appearances were right handed, but his putrid .635 OPS from that side likely led to the precipitous drop in righty plate appearances the following season.

For whatever reason, I was under the impression that Ross, like so many other right-handed hitting backup catchers, hit left-handed pitching better than right-handed pitching. But this simply isn’t the case. Over the course of his career, his batting average and on-base percentage are slightly higher from the right side, but his slugging and OPS+ (the adjusted OPS based on the player’s ballpark and league) are higher from the left side. Ross may not hit much against righties anyway though, considering that Saltalamacchia plays exclusively against them.

A few quick thoughts on Saltalamacchia: After two full seasons with Boston, I feel the book on him is out. He’ll post solid power numbers for a catcher (41 home runs in two seasons), but he won’t provide much in terms of batting average (.222 last season) or on-base percentage (.288 in both seasons) and he had one of the worst caught stealing percentages last season by a catcher (.184).

Because Saltalamacchia doesn’t hit for a high average, reach base frequently or throw runners out often enough, I don’t the Red Sox should anoint him as their catcher of the future. In fact, I wouldn’t be totally shocked to see Ross have more plate appearances this season, if Saltalamacchia’s average and on-base percentage don’t increase and/or his power numbers fall off. I say this not because I view Ross as Boston’s catcher of the future, but mainly because I feel like they should treat this year as an evaluation year for the players that were retained in Boston’s mid-season fire sale last year. It’s possible that I’m being too harsh on Saltalamacchia, but if this is truly a rebuilding year for Boston — and I’m not sure it is — like so many are speculating, now would be the time for him to show improvement from his first two years. And if he does not improve, why include him in your plans for the future?

Getting back to Ross, overall, this isn’t an earth-shattering move. It won’t make Boston contenders, and it won’t make them cellar-dwellers either. In fact, his performance may dictate Boston’s record by no more than one win. And the decision whether to play him or Saltalamacchia regularly won’t have a drastic impact on the Red Sox’s feature either. So I guess this is my way of apologizing to all of you who just read 600-plus words on David Ross and Jarrod Saltalamacchia.

Jackson Alexander can be reached at jtalexan@student.umass.edu and followed on Twitter @MDC_Alexander.

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