Scrolling Headlines:

UMass hockey loses ninth straight, falls to No. 9 BU 6-3 -

February 5, 2016

UMass hockey can’t heed coach John Micheletto’s warning in 6-3 loss against BU -

February 5, 2016

Jury convicts Patrick Durocher of rape, assault and battery -

February 5, 2016

UMass student dies Friday morning -

February 5, 2016

Puck Talk: UMass prepares for the Terriers -

February 5, 2016

Third and 20: the Super Bowl -

February 5, 2016

UMass women’s basketball set to take on Fordham at Mullins -

February 4, 2016

UMass investigating alleged misuse of campus resources within Physical Plant -

February 4, 2016

Closing arguments delivered as Patrick Durocher trial moves toward resolution -

February 4, 2016

UMass football announces 30 members to its 2016 recruiting class -

February 4, 2016

Dean’s Beans founder speaks at first MassPIRG meeting of semester -

February 4, 2016

UMass revises guest policy for Super Bowl weekend -

February 4, 2016

UMass graduates are ‘attractive to employers’ -

February 4, 2016

IT to host open forum, discuss new acceptable use and confidentiality policies -

February 4, 2016

Herrell’s hosts event to support Whole Children -

February 4, 2016

UMass police chief hiring procedure involves input from across campus -

February 4, 2016

UMass men’s and women’s track and field set to perform this weekend in preparation for the Atlantic 10 championships -

February 4, 2016

Heather MacLean shines in junior season for UMass track and field -

February 4, 2016

UMass hockey squares off with No. 9 Boston University Friday night -

February 4, 2016

UMass women’s basketball blows lead, loses in overtime -

February 4, 2016

Al Jazeera America: A new kind of news

Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com/flickr

Since the founding of Fox News Channel in 1996, the American news scene has remained essentially the same. Traditionally, Fox caters to conservative audiences, ABC, CBS and NBC cater to left-leaning audiences, MSNBC caters to liberal audiences, and CNN provides more moderate views. However, in recent years, other news stations have been coming to America from foreign countries.

For University of Massachusetts students, all one needs to do is merely turn on the television to find that foreign stations, such as China’s CCTV and Germany’s Deutsche Welle, are available. Such news stations provide an entirely different variety of news than the mainstream American media do – news that isn’t, well, American.

Unlike American news broadcasters, which only run stories on the largest of international events, these news stations focus on world news, as they are the international branches of their respective news agencies. World news is given very little emphasis on American news channels, as television networks make money from advertisements, and thus by viewership rates, and people want to watch stories about pop culture and their favorite celebrities rather than about what is actually happening in the world. There is a market for world news; it just does not have the high demand the major networks want. This leaves the world news market, a sector gradually increasing in importance as the populace becomes more educated, open to foreign competition.

Riding this trend of foreign news is Al Jazeera, the most well-known news agency in the Arab world, which just recently bought Current TV, and thus access to more than 60 million American television subscribers. In the past, Al Jazeera has been criticized for broadcasting videos released by Al Qaeda and its sympathizers, and has been labeled by some as anti-American or even pro-terrorist. Some have even argued that the Qatari government – which previously owned Al Jazeera – is attempting to spread pro-Muslim propaganda in the U.S. market through this expansion.

This, of course, is ridiculous; Al Jazeera is just a news agency. One need only look at Al Jazeera’s English edition website to see what Al Jazeera America, the new branch that will provide programming for Al Jazeera’s newfound presence in the American market, will be like.

The English edition, which can be streamed for free on the Internet, provides world news, particularly in regard to the Arab world and the Indian subcontinent. The articles are rather normal and what one would expect of an international news agency. This holds true for the Arabic edition as well. In addition, Qatar, while still governed by absolute monarchy, is one of the United States’ strongest allies on the Arabian Peninsula. The country has an incredibly diverse (more than 50 percent foreign) population, and maintains a strong, flourishing domestic economy. It seems unlikely that Qatar would have a devious plot to indoctrinate the American people in radical Islam.

Regardless of the skepticism that Al Jazeera America may be biased, one ought to view this development as an opportunity to see what the Arab world sees. A world of peace and cooperation isn’t possible if we don’t know how the world is to others, and this includes their views and opinions, not just the casualty lists found in American coverage of the Middle East.

It is preposterous to require that Al Jazeera America be completely unbiased, seeing as we as a nation are perfectly content with the current status quo of obvious news bias. For informed viewers, Al Jazeera will be an opportunity to observe and understand the events and opinions of the Middle East without needing an American news agency as a middleman. After all, the purpose of watching the news is not to passively accept everything it tells you but, rather, to analyze and understand it.

Stefan Herlitz is a Collegian columnist. He can be reached at sherlitz@student.umass.edu.

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