Scrolling Headlines:

Baldwin’s floor-spacing sparks UMass men’s basketball against Georgia -

December 17, 2017

Hot outside shooting leads UMass over Georgia -

December 16, 2017

Minutemen knock off Georgia for big statement win -

December 16, 2017

Cale Makar selected to play for Team Canada at the 2018 World Junior Championships -

December 15, 2017

UMass men’s basketball looks to remain undefeated at home when Georgia comes to town -

December 15, 2017

Editorial: Our shift to a primarily digital world -

December 13, 2017

Makar, Ferraro off to Ontario to compete for Team Canada’s World Junior hockey team -

December 12, 2017

Lecture attempts to answer whether treatment of depression has resulted in over-prescription of SSRIs -

December 12, 2017

Palestinian students on campus react to President Trump’s recent declaration -

December 12, 2017

Smith College hosts social media panel addressing impact of social media on government policies -

December 12, 2017

GOP Tax Plan will trouble working grad students -

December 12, 2017

Mario Ferraro making his mark with UMass -

December 12, 2017

Minutewomen look to keep momentum going against UMass Lowell -

December 12, 2017

Ames: UMass hockey’s turnaround is real, and it’s happening now -

December 12, 2017

When your favorite comedian is accused of sexual assault -

December 12, 2017

A snapshot of my college experience -

December 12, 2017

Homelessness is an issue that’s close to home -

December 12, 2017

Allowing oil drilling in Alaska sets a dangerous precedent -

December 12, 2017

‘She’s Gotta Have It’ is a television triumph -

December 12, 2017

Some of my favorite everyday brands -

December 12, 2017

Trashy Chief Keef album regresses rap back to stereotypes

Facebook

Overall, 2012 was a good year for hip-hop releases. T.I. made a startling comeback with “Trouble Man: Heavy Is the Head,” Nas had the surprisingly fantastic “Life Is Good” and, of course, the man everyone is raving about, Kendrick Lamar shot to the limelight with “Good Kid, M.A.A.D. City.”

It is a little disheartening then to see Chief Keef bring out the worst of the genre with his debut album “Finally Rich.” Lyrically weak and rhythmically challenged, Keef has done himself no favors with music critics anywhere.

The majority of rhymes on the album represent why rap is a genre that is so heavily criticized for being violent, misogynistic and encouraging of a drug-induced lifestyle. At times, it gets so ridiculous that it’s almost as if “Finally Rich” is a parody of stereotypical gangsta rap.

The perfect example of this would be the song “Hate Bein’ Sober,” which features 50 Cent and Wiz Khalifa. Part of the chorus reads: “When we roll up bitches be on us/So the hoes that love smoking and love drinking/Anti-sober for no reason/Cause we can’t spell ‘sober.’”

Enough said.

It is important to keep in mind that Keef’s fan-base is not one that consists of people who are hoping to find some profound message in his lyrics; the tracks on “Finally Rich” are more hip-pop than hip-hop, only there to entertain and sound good with a catchy beat, and here is where the problem lies – Keef does not fully accomplish that either.

The songs on the album are all so similar sounding from start to finish that they start getting annoying and lose significant replay value. Khalifa is an example of an artist who is just as bad content wise, but he manages to make every song so different sounding that it is much easier to overlook his lack of lyrical prowess. This is the main flaw of the album. It does not manage to be a fun album you can bump in the car or at a party. It simply gets monotonous too quickly.

There are only two factors that save “Finally Rich” from being the worst hip-hop album of 2012. First, there is the fact that you cannot deny that the music is mostly strong even though there is no lyrical substance to back it up.  “I Don’t Like,” “No Tomorrow,” “Kay Kay” and “Laughin’ to the Bank” are all songs that feature fresh sounding production, with beats that boom with the right amount of bass.

It comes as no surprise then that Kanye West, one of the most original and inventive producers in the industry today, chose to remix “I Don’t Like,” though his edit ended up being better than Keef’s original.

Secondly, as borderline idiotic as some of the lyrical content is, Keef becomes pretty endearing by the end of the album. After 15 tracks of hearing him brag about his recently acquired riches and fame, one can’t help but feel happy for him. His confidence is consistently sky high, and that’s something that nobody can take away from him at these early stages of his career.

It’ll be interesting to see whether Keef chooses to do something different on his sophomore effort than he has with “Finally Rich.” The potential is there, but he needs drastic improvement lyrically.

Ayush Kumar can be reached at ayush@student.umass.edu.

Leave A Comment