March 30, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

Hird appointed dean of College of Social and Behavioral Sciences -

Monday, March 30, 2015

UMass women’s lax cruises to 17-7 win over George Mason -

Monday, March 30, 2015

Earl Sweatshirt explores his dark side on great sophomore album -

Monday, March 30, 2015

East Village explosion painful, revealing -

Monday, March 30, 2015

Courtney Barnett offers unique outlook on life on debut album -

Monday, March 30, 2015

Lessons learned from a boy band -

Monday, March 30, 2015

Angela McMahon earns 100th career win in UMass women’s lacrosse’s win over George Mason -

Monday, March 30, 2015

Cornell professor explores education, politics and inequality -

Monday, March 30, 2015

UMass softball swept by St. Joseph’s -

Monday, March 30, 2015

Kendrick Lamar’s ‘To Pimp a Butterfly’ is a wild, unpredictable masterpiece -

Monday, March 30, 2015

UMass baseball falls 8-0 to VCU in series finale -

Monday, March 30, 2015

UMass men’s lacrosse’s win streak snapped in battle with No. 18 Towson -

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Closing arguments presented, jury deliberations begin Friday in first of four 2012 gang rape trials -

Friday, March 27, 2015

UMass library opens groundbreaking 3D printing lab -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Defendant in 2012 gang rape case says accuser consented to sex -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

For the love of the craft: UMass Juggling Club -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass lacrosse looks for fourth straight victory versus Towson -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

The dark, twisty special on Robert Durst proves that, yet again, humanity’s biggest “Jinx” is hubris -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Law and order, UMass style -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Hillel fails to represent all Jewish students -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass sociologists challenge parental leave myth

flickr/dailycollegian

Sociological researchers at the University of Massachusetts recently published their findings in the winter edition of the academic journal, “Fathering,” seeking to examine myths regarding the differing uses of paid parental leave at universities.

Titled “Work-Time, Housework, Carework, and Work-Life Balance: An Assessment of Faculty at the University of Massachusetts,” the study investigates whether or not the assumption that “men take unfair advantage of parental leave” holds true, according to a press release.

In their study, UMass authors Jennifer Lundquist and Joya Misra along with University of Maryland’s KerryAnn O’Meara challenged the belief that men abuse their paid parental leave time in an unfair way, calling the idea a “myth.”

“Critics of gender-neutral parental leave systems have claimed that male faculty are a greater threat to exploit the system,” the release said, adding that “they are more likely to have female spouses who stay home full-time, or only work part-time, to raise their children.”

However, the study found that those accusations are not supported by substantial data, according to the release.

Using surveys, focus groups and qualitative one-on-one interviews, researchers compiled data that revealed that UMass faculty members did not fit the profile of those that critics believe take advantage of the system, the release said.

Sample data revealed that a significant number of male faculty members at UMass did not take any parental leave at all. According to the release, the portion of the sample that did take their leave either did not have a spouse who regularly stayed home full-time or their spouse was a breastfeeding mother.

The release added that faculty members who did not take any parental leave believed they would be seen as lazy workers or as researchers who took the time off to further their own research rather than assist in childcare.

The findings also indicate that both men and women in the sciences and mathematics departments (STEM) were at the bottom of the list as least likely to take leave, the release said.

“Many STEM disciplines are still male-faculty dominated,” Lundquist said in the release, “and our participants described informal departmental cultures which operate on the outdated assumption that faculty have a stay-at-home partner to provide support.”

While acknowledging that the system is not perfect, Lundquist believes simple fixes can be made to the framework already in place, according to the release. Lundquist claims that the system is currently grounded in beliefs that are no longer true.

“The outdated notion of a worker with no care responsibilities doesn’t fit the experience of most academics,” Misra said in the release. “Leave policies of this type have the potential to reconfigure academic work more broadly — to the benefit of all faculty and their family members.”

 

Jeffrey Okerman can be reached at jokerman@student.umass.edu.

 

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