December 20, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

BLOG: UMass football recruiting roundup: UMass signs DT, offers two kickers -

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

UMass President Robert Caret resigns to become chancellor of the University of Maryland system -

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Brandon Montour: ‘It felt great to be out there’ -

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

UMass falls to Northeastern in Brandon Montour’s debut -

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Cady Lalanne continues to evolve as a potential outside shooting threat -

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

UMass hockey returns to action against Northeastern, Montour to make season debut -

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Demetrius Dyson remains hopeful despite rocky start to season -

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Former UMass soccer star Matt Keys aims to continue his career professionally -

Monday, December 15, 2014

Pierre-Louis, Dillard shine in UMass victory over Holy Cross -

Sunday, December 14, 2014

Passing, spacing improved in UMass victory -

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Prolific first half propels UMass past Canisius, 75-58 -

Saturday, December 13, 2014

UMass Faculty Senate hears ad hoc committee’s report on FBS football, shoots down contentious motion -

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Minutemen hope improved spacing will aid struggling half court offense -

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Divest UMass urges Board of Trustees to split with fossil fuel industry -

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Cady Lalanne accustomed to dealing with increased attention -

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Front to Back: Week of Dec. 1, 2014 -

Monday, December 8, 2014

Chiarelli: UMass basketball running out of time to find its identity -

Monday, December 8, 2014

Minutewomen take care of business against American -

Monday, December 8, 2014

UMass women’s basketball handles American, 71-61 -

Sunday, December 7, 2014

UMass basketball downed by Florida Gulf Coast 84-75 -

Sunday, December 7, 2014

Weekly Peace Vigil draws in locals during cold winter months

Bryn Rothschild-Shea/Collegian

On a cold February Sunday at noon, about six locals gathered at the Amherst Town Common and braved wind and occasional snow flurries, taking part in a weekly vigil that has been held on Sunday afternoons in downtown Amherst for 34 years.

The Amherst Vigil for Peace and Justice in a Nuclear Free World advocates for worldwide social justice, an end to nuclear weapons and an end to arms trades, according to the free flyers participants hand out to passersby, while others hold signs and banners.

Bundled in a coat and helping to hold a banner that read: “Peace cannot be achieved by force” was Pat Church, a regular attendee of the peace vigils.

Since the late 1970s, the vigil, according to Church, has been “overarching,” and “inclusive.”

“Our focus is almost anything that has to do with justice whether it’s for women or minorities or different aspects of the war machine in different places, such as Iraq or Afghanistan, or now Africa or Yemen ,” she said.

Church explained that the vigil was started by a couple who had been holding a vigil in Springfield in opposition to war in the 1970s. When the couple relocated to the Pioneer Valley, they decided Amherst needed a vigil, too.

“Some vigils are exclusive. They only want to talk about one issue, but if you want to come and bring a sign and talk about an issue, we’re pretty welcoming,” added Church.

At the vigils, there are a variety of signs displayed. Depending on how many people are present, sometimes they break up into groups of people who want to talk about issues and others who want to hold signs and pass out flyers.

Holding a sign that read, “Stop U.S. Wars,” Dade Singapuri, a regular at the peace vigils, said she attends as often as possible. A particular issue that concerns Singapuri and inspires her to come to the vigils, she said, is U.S. drone attacks. Singapuri is concerned about civilians who she said live in fear of drone attacks on a regular basis, afraid to go out in groups for events like weddings or funerals, since drone attacks are said to target people in large groups.

“Drones are part of our military prison industrial complex. This country is the biggest exporter of weapons in the world. The more people who kill each other … the better our business is.”

Church said that attendance at the vigil is largely dependent on the time of year and the weather. On this chilly day, only about six people were present, and a few people stopped by briefly for a flyer or to talk, and then continued on their way.

Church added that sometimes attendees are people who used to partake in vigils when they were kids, growing up in the Amherst area.

Mark Watkins, another regular attendee, said there were some Sundays before the Iraq War began when a hundred or so people showed up. Often, he said, they get dozens of people. Watkins said he comes to the vigil every Sunday.

Watkins noted that there is free lunch offered every Sunday for anybody who chooses to stay for the entire hour and hold a sign. They get the food from Amherst Chinese Food, not far from where the vigil takes place.

“We don’t know what our effect is just (by) being here,” added Church. “But we have had people come back and say what we talked about here really engaged their mind, and (they) looked into it and wound up changing (their) major or things like that.”

Steffi Porter can be reached at steffi@student.umass.edu

Comments
2 Responses to “Weekly Peace Vigil draws in locals during cold winter months”
  1. D.L Kennedy says:

    Just wondering why there are not protests in Amherst against the killing perpetrated by Islamist fanatics around the world, including those in Iran, Lebanon, Syria, Mali, Libya, Gaza and Iraq. The Syrian government has killed at least 60,000 people in the last year. The Amherst vigil remains silent. It just isn’t PC to speak out against the misogynist, homophobic, and anti-Christian and anti-Semitic Islamist fundamentalists who kill thousands of people each month, and who threaten the United States and its allies. The Amherst vigil is protesting against the United States instead of against the people who truly are opposed to peace.

  2. David Hunt 1990 says:

    Those who beat their swords into plowshears will plow for those who don’t.

    The pacifist is as surely a traitor to his country and to humanity as is the most brutal wrongdoer. — Theodore Roosevelt

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