August 29, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Suspect in custody after break-ins on Lincoln Avenue -

Thursday, August 28, 2014

UMass crime alerts reveal reports of lewd acts -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass women’s soccer hopes added depth brings more consistency in 2014 -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass mourns death of alumnus and journalist James Foley -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Kassan Messiah, Trey Seals to shoulder pass rushing responsibility for UMass football -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

UMass names Blake Frohnapfel as the starting quarterback -

Monday, August 18, 2014

Decision looms for Mark Whipple as UMass football looks to name starting quarterback -

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Former UMass star Marcel Shipp overseeing a strong running back competition -

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Former UMass basketball star Chaz Williams signs professional contract in Turkey, still eyeing NBA career -

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Minutemen anxious to display aggressive defense -

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

UMass football turns the page, excited for 2014 season -

Monday, August 4, 2014

UMass student struck and killed by vehicle Thursday night -

Friday, August 1, 2014

UMass receives anonymous $10.3 million gift -

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

UMass football summer coverage 2014 -

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

UMass Rowing finishes NCAA Championships, ends year ranked No. 21 in the nation -

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Two UMass basketball alums to compete for a lofty prize in The Basketball Tournament -

Friday, May 23, 2014

Commencement Photos 2014 -

Thursday, May 15, 2014

University of Massachusetts researcher selected for professorship

Courtesy of Umass.edu

The University of Groningen’s Kapteyn Astronomical Institute has chosen a University of Massachusetts professor to receive one of the highest honors in the field of Astronomy, according to a University press release.

Daniela Calzetti, an astronomy researcher at the university, was named the 2013-14 Blaauw Professor at the Dutch institution for her “excellence in research, broad knowledge of astronomy and an outstanding international status in astronomy,” the release said.

Calling the honor “completely unexpected,” Calzetti said she felt “very honored because there aren’t many such positions for astronomers.

“It’s a great honor for me to be included among the extremely famous and accomplished astronomers who have received this professorship in the past,” Calzetti said in the press release.

As part of the honor, Calzetti will spend four weeks out of the next year in Groningen, Netherlands, where she will deliver a series of four lectures regarding her current research projects to a group of graduate and doctoral students. Furthermore, a day-long symposium that will cover a topic of her choice will be organized.

Calzetti is best known for a tool known as “Calzetti’s Law,” which allowed astronomers to estimate how much information was being lost due to dust that obscured research of very distant galaxies. The tool, developed in the mid-1990s, helped Calzetti gain worldwide recognition as a researcher of galaxy formation, according to the release.

“Daniela’s research on galaxies has been groundbreaking,” said Stephen Schneider, the chairperson of the astronomy department, in the release. “She richly deserves to be added to the extremely distinguished group of astronomers awarded Blaauw Professorships.”

The Blaauw chair and lecture was first instituted in 1997 in tribute to former professor Adriaan Blaauw. Calzetti joins a list of 13 previous winners, and is preceded by Roger Blandford of Stanford University.

Calzetti has been involved in a number of projects that have been tasked with exploring space. Along with galaxy formation, she has also studied star formation and dust properties and their emissions. She has also worked on Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope with projects “aimed at characterizing star formation in the local and medium-distance Universe,” the release said.

“We’re making progress on how to map the formation of new stars in galaxies, that is, asking why stars form in certain places and not others, what factors drive that,” Calzetti said in the release. “There are many different types of galaxies and they seem to form stars according to their own personality.”

“We have many ideas, she said, “but few hard-core facts.”

Jeffrey Okerman can be reached at jokerman@student.umass.edu.

 

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