November 1, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Front to Back: Week of Oct. 27, 2014 -

Friday, October 31, 2014

Blog Post: What the FAC -

Friday, October 31, 2014

Halloween Special Issue -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

UM alumni hopeful for their up-and-coming snowboard company -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

UMass hockey looks to end road trip on a high note with weekend series against Maine -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

#WrongDoor: Why I am not surprised? -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

B-horror films: hits and misses of the nightmare genre -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Appreciating campus workers -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

UMass hosts Ebola panel to address concerns of the public -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

UMass Democrats hope to get more students connected -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The broke college student horror comic buyers guide -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

UMass Republican Club: Not just for Republicans -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Five reasons why Halloween is the best holiday -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

To live and die and live again -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

The anatomy of a horror game -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Berger has first shot at securing starting role with UMass basketball -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Robert Johnson’s deal with the devil -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Humans vs. Zombies: UMass’ most dangerous game -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Group Halloween costumes inspired by the roles of Hollywood icons -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

A haunting at UMass -

Thursday, October 30, 2014

University of Massachusetts researcher selected for professorship

Courtesy of Umass.edu

The University of Groningen’s Kapteyn Astronomical Institute has chosen a University of Massachusetts professor to receive one of the highest honors in the field of Astronomy, according to a University press release.

Daniela Calzetti, an astronomy researcher at the university, was named the 2013-14 Blaauw Professor at the Dutch institution for her “excellence in research, broad knowledge of astronomy and an outstanding international status in astronomy,” the release said.

Calling the honor “completely unexpected,” Calzetti said she felt “very honored because there aren’t many such positions for astronomers.

“It’s a great honor for me to be included among the extremely famous and accomplished astronomers who have received this professorship in the past,” Calzetti said in the press release.

As part of the honor, Calzetti will spend four weeks out of the next year in Groningen, Netherlands, where she will deliver a series of four lectures regarding her current research projects to a group of graduate and doctoral students. Furthermore, a day-long symposium that will cover a topic of her choice will be organized.

Calzetti is best known for a tool known as “Calzetti’s Law,” which allowed astronomers to estimate how much information was being lost due to dust that obscured research of very distant galaxies. The tool, developed in the mid-1990s, helped Calzetti gain worldwide recognition as a researcher of galaxy formation, according to the release.

“Daniela’s research on galaxies has been groundbreaking,” said Stephen Schneider, the chairperson of the astronomy department, in the release. “She richly deserves to be added to the extremely distinguished group of astronomers awarded Blaauw Professorships.”

The Blaauw chair and lecture was first instituted in 1997 in tribute to former professor Adriaan Blaauw. Calzetti joins a list of 13 previous winners, and is preceded by Roger Blandford of Stanford University.

Calzetti has been involved in a number of projects that have been tasked with exploring space. Along with galaxy formation, she has also studied star formation and dust properties and their emissions. She has also worked on Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope with projects “aimed at characterizing star formation in the local and medium-distance Universe,” the release said.

“We’re making progress on how to map the formation of new stars in galaxies, that is, asking why stars form in certain places and not others, what factors drive that,” Calzetti said in the release. “There are many different types of galaxies and they seem to form stars according to their own personality.”

“We have many ideas, she said, “but few hard-core facts.”

Jeffrey Okerman can be reached at jokerman@student.umass.edu.

 

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