Scrolling Headlines:

Nick Mariano, Zach Oliveri transferring from UMass men’s lacrosse program -

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Four months after banning Iranian students from certain graduate programs, UMass announces new measures to ensure compliance with U.S. law -

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Justin King sentenced to eight to 12 years in prison -

Monday, June 29, 2015

Two future UMass hockey players selected in 2015 NHL Draft -

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Supreme Court ruling clears way for same-sex marriage nationwide -

Friday, June 26, 2015

Former UMass center Cady Lalanne taken 55th overall by Spurs in 2015 NBA Draft -

Friday, June 26, 2015

Second of four men found guilty on three counts of aggravated rape in 2012 UMass gang rape case -

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Boston bomber speaks out for first time: ‘I am sorry for the lives I have taken’ -

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

King claims sex with woman was consensual during alleged 2012 gang rape -

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Wrongful death suit filed in death of UMass student -

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Ryan Bamford uses online Q&A session to discuss UMass football conference search, renovation plans, cost of attendance -

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Opening statements delivered, first witnesses called in second trial for alleged 2012 gang rape at UMass -

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

UMass Board of Trustees approves rise in tuition, student fees -

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Former Minutewoman Quianna Diaz-Patterson named to Puerto Rican national softball team -

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

UMass rowing’s Jim Dietz inducted into CRCA Hall of Fame -

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Jury selection begins Monday in second gang rape trial -

Monday, June 15, 2015

Students turn attention to state legislators as decision on UMass budget looms -

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Alumna and next director of Brooklyn Museum Anne Pasternak ‘created her own path’ -

Thursday, June 11, 2015

UMass graduate crowned head of 600-year-old Indian kingdom -

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Committee recommends UMass increase tuition, student fees for in-state undergraduates -

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

NOW President Terry O’Neill to speak about challenges facing feminists

Wikipedia

Terry O’Neill, president of the National Organization for Women, will discuss the past, present and future challenges facing feminists at the 2013 Rossi Lecture on Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom at the University of Massachusetts.

 

The event is free and open to the public, and a reception will follow.

O’Neill, elected NOW president in 2009, is a feminist lawyer, professor and activist for social justice. She is also president of the NOW foundation and chair of the NOW Political Action Committees, serving as the principal spokesperson for all three of her positions within the organization.

The lecture is part of the Alice S. and Peter H. Rossi Lecture series, which honors the academic couple that taught at UMass for several years. Both of the Rossis were named Distinguished Professors as members of the sociology department and were each separately elected president of the American Sociological Association.

Each year, the lecture series alternates between the honorees, presenting a renowned public figure that pursues Mr. Rossi’s interests one year and one who champions Mrs. Rossi’s causes the next.

This year, the series is dedicated to Alice, one of the original founders of the National Organization for Women.

O’Neill has long been involved in key political and social movements. As a political organizer, O’Neill worked on several historic campaigns, including Hillary Clinton’s campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, Barack Obama’s presidential campaign and the campaign leading to the election of Louisiana senator Mary Landrieu. She has also written several federal amicus briefs on abortion rights for the Louisiana chapter of NOW, Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union.

O’Neill currently oversees NOW’s multi-issue agenda, which includes advancing reproductive freedom, promoting diversity, ending racism, achieving equality for women, stopping violence against women and ending sexual discrimination. The lecture will bring a narrower focus to these causes, highlighting the challenges feminists face as they pursue reform.

Eric Bosco can be reached at ebosco@student.umass.edu.

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