March 28, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

Closing arguments presented, jury deliberations begin Friday in first of four 2012 gang rape trials -

Friday, March 27, 2015

UMass library opens groundbreaking 3D printing lab -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Defendant in 2012 gang rape case says accuser consented to sex -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

For the love of the craft: UMass Juggling Club -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass lacrosse looks for fourth straight victory versus Towson -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

The dark, twisty special on Robert Durst proves that, yet again, humanity’s biggest “Jinx” is hubris -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Law and order, UMass style -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Hillel fails to represent all Jewish students -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass women’s lacrosse aims another perfect conference record against Duquesne -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass heads home to take on Albany -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Coming off weekend victory, UMass softball prepares for series against St. Josephs -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

‘The Last Man on Earth?’ more like, ‘The Worst Show on Earth’ -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

A new face for money -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass hopes to carry momentum into weekend series against VCU -

Thursday, March 26, 2015

UMass Theatre Guild to present “Seussical” this weekend -

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

UMass eyes the future of its athletics with the hiring of Athletic Director Ryan Bamford -

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Derrick Gordon to transfer from UMass in search of more prominent role -

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Local author and activist Don Ogden writes to make environmental change -

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Chiarelli: Football the center of attention Tuesday at Bamford’s hiring -

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

MANNA soup kitchen continues to feed the local hungry in Northampton -

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

UMass scientists awarded $1M Keck Foundation grant

Courtesy of UMass.edu

A group of University of Massachusetts physicists were recently awarded a three-year $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to carry out research on ultra-thin films, according to a University press release.

Physicists Narayanan Menon, Benny Davidovitch and Christopher Santangelo, along with polymer scientist Thomas Russell, were recently awarded the grant in order to explore and develop the science behind delivering ultra-thin films into liquids.

According to the release, the W.M. Keck Science and Engineering Program seeks to extend funding to programs with “endeavors that are distinctive and novel in their approach. It encourages projects that are high-risk with the potential for transformative impact.”

Menon and his team will work on a series of projects over the three-year period, with each project “more difficult than the last,” the release said.

Their main focus will be creating a material that will begin crumpled up, but once the materials are introduced to a particular environment, will expand to create a super thin barrier between two materials.

In the release, Menon describes a situation where a ball, which appears to be a simple crumpled piece of paper, “instantly unfurls” when thrown at a wall, covering the wall in a sheet of paper that is up to “10,000 times thinner” than a normal sheet of paper.

“We have preliminary experiments that indicate the feasibility of this approach,” Menon said in the release. “But we need many further experiments and theoretical work to understand and control how such a film spontaneously and explosively unfurls when it is placed between two liquids.”

Each member of the team of collaborators brings their own set of expertise to the lab bench. According to the release, Menon’s lab works with the behavioral qualities of soft materials, while Davidovitch and Santangelo maintain backgrounds in the “role of geometry and mechanics in the formation of patterns.” Russell, the team’s final member, is an expert in interfacial materials and their assembly.

Though a majority of the grant money will be used to assemble a team of graduate students and researchers, that team will be pivotal in performing the many experiments over the next three years that won them the grant.

Topics that the team hopes to tackle include the “dynamics of uncrumpling, interactions between crumpled objects dispersed in a fluid, elasticity of heterogeneous and anisotropic films and the mechanics of an interface laden with a mosaic of elastic sheets,” according to the release.

Should the team make significant headway in its research, practical applications could include bandaging leaks, sequestering oil spills or shrink-wrap drops, according to the release.

Jeffrey Okerman can be reached at jokerman@student.umass.edu.

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