Scrolling Headlines:

Amazon textbook contract ending in December 2018 -

October 19, 2017

UMass field hockey heads into crucial A-10 matchup -

October 19, 2017

2017 Hockey Special Issue -

October 19, 2017

International Relations Club tackles tough issues at ‘Foreign Policy Coffee Hour’ -

October 19, 2017

Sexual assault reports spike on campus -

October 19, 2017

Californian students react to wildfires back home -

October 19, 2017

‘My Little Pony: The Movie’ is a surprising animated treat, whether you’re a fan of the show or not -

October 19, 2017

With a young team, Carvel is preparing the UMass hockey team to thrive -

October 19, 2017

Letter: UMass hockey is great, but where are the students? -

October 19, 2017

Boino’s blast gives UMass men’s soccer sole possession of first place in the Atlantic 10 -

October 19, 2017

UMass freshmen look to play physical, make an impact and improve early on -

October 19, 2017

UMass hockey sets out to create new program, identity in 2017-18 -

October 19, 2017

Cale Makar: UMass hockey’s crown jewel -

October 19, 2017

Ames: If first four games are any indicator, this UMass hockey season could differ for the better -

October 19, 2017

Josh Couturier looks to find where he fits within UMass lineup -

October 19, 2017

The straw man fallacy: missing the point on Indigenous Peoples Day -

October 19, 2017

Power to the Thin Mint: improve the Girls Scouts program -

October 19, 2017

‘Blade Runner 2049’ has a lot of ideas that it fails to develop -

October 19, 2017

Early season challenge awaits for UMass hockey in weekend set with Ohio State -

October 18, 2017

UMass Professor Barbara Krauthamer receives award from Association of Black Women Historians -

October 18, 2017

Isenberg makes BusinessWeek’s ‘Top 50 Business Schools Nationwide’

Collegian File Photo

The Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts placed 45th overall and 20th among public universities in BusinessWeek’s undergraduate program rankings last week.

Up 19 spots from last year, the ranking caps off a four-year period during which Isenberg has seen consistent improvement in its BusinessWeek ranking.

Isenberg Dean Mark Fuller believes that the University is on the path he envisioned when he became dean of the business school in 2009.

“We’ve pushed for enhancing the reputation of the school as a central part of our strategic vision,” Fuller said. “The reputation of the school will help graduates get better jobs and make better connections with alumni.”

A graduate and Ph.D. candidate at the University of Arizona, Fuller worked for the business schools at Baylor University and Washington State University before coming to UMass.  Immediately upon the start of his new position as dean, Fuller set his expectations high.

“Our goal since I came on has been to achieve a top 40 ranking for undergraduate programming,” Fuller said. “In any business you have to know what you’re striving for and focus on that goal. So once we established that goal and that vision, we tried to build programming to achieve it.”

Isenberg has gone through some major changes since 2010 when the school was ranked 78th overall

The finance major has been redesigned to include four sub-concentrations within the major that a student can choose from. The operations and information management group, formerly a track in the management major, is now its own major to educate students on technological advancements and how they apply to business. The Dean’s Leadership Seminar, a one-credit course for freshmen, is a weekly lecture that brings in successful alumni from Isenberg to give advice and help prepare students for the challenges they will face in the business world.

The changes have not been limited to in-classroom programming.

In 2011, Professor Stephen Floyd – the Eugene Isenberg Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship – was appointed head of the school’s campaign to raise the job recruiter satisfaction rating to within the top 20 in the nation. As of 2013, UMass ranks 13th.

While Fuller gives partial credit to programming and leadership, he states that it is the Isenberg students that are the driving force behind the school’s success and accolades.

“In my second year here, I did a branding analysis to see what the Isenberg brand was,” Fuller said. “We participated in focus groups with recruiters, alumni, faculty and current students. What we found was that the unifying qualities for Isenberg students are persistence, tenacity, and a strong work ethic. We can teach the business skills, but you can’t teach work ethic.”

“In any business, culture is extremely important,” he added, “and in the four years I’ve been here, I’ve seen a dramatic shift in the culture, starting with the students’ desire to be excellent and the faculty’s willingness to fill that desire. That’s more exciting to me than any ranking in a magazine.”

 

James Petroskey can be reached at jpetrosk@student.umass.edu.

 

Leave A Comment