April 18, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

John Ashcroft faces criticism during speech -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Student rally in support of Gordon, LGBTQ community -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Thousands gather in Amherst Commons for 23rd Annual Extravaganja -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Sexual violence is not ‘normal’ -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

One year after Boston Marathon bombings, UMass doctor Pierre Rouzier continues passion to help -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Photo Slideshow: UMass United Rally -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Get Yourself Tested at UMass -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass football continues move in new direction in annual Spring Game -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Library labyrinth targets stress -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

There is nothing to debate about global warming -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass hits the road to take on LaSalle -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

No. 11 UMass women’s lacrosse looks to extend winning streak against Richmond -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Southeastern Conference commissioner Mike Slive latest McCormack Executive-in-Residence -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Got a little Irish in you? -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass doctoral student awarded Soros Fellowship -

Thursday, April 17, 2014

UMass Dressage Team discusses the lesser-known sport -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Canelas: Things worth watching in Spring Game 2014 -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

‘The Walking Dead’ finale resurrects a dull season -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Five places to study at UMass -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

UMass tennis team battles injuries as season comes to an end -

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Letter to the editor

To the editor:

Viewing clear photos of the Boston Marathon attack suspects made me happy and relieved about their appearance. Why?

After the Muslim prayer was not heard, ‘God please let them not be Muslim; God please let them not be Muslim,’ and the guys turned out to be Muslim, I was praying that ‘God let them be without beard; God please let them be without beard.’ Great! They were white and without beards. I am a Middle Easterner and grow a black beard, a very black one; it has the potential to make people suspicious of me even though my beard is short and trimmed, unlike the Talibanic one. Now that they are not bearded I can keep my beautiful beard without need to shave it.

I have lived in the Valley for five years and I did not come across any racial problems. These days, however, when I walk in downtown Amherst or Northampton, I am suspicious of people looking at me; if it were before, I would say it is because of my handsome, very handsome beard. But after the marathon tragedy, their looks toward black-bearded Middle Easterners seem different. Someone looks at me and I think: What do those people think about me? Do they consider me responsible for these acts of terror? Do they think my black beard makes me capable of such violence too; if not now, perhaps later?

Now that we know the guys were not bearded, I can keep my black scruff and go back to interpreting people’s stares as if they were looking at a very handsome bearded gentleman.

Mohsen Jalali

 

Comments
3 Responses to “Letter to the editor”
  1. Kris says:

    Keep on beardin’.

  2. Khepel says:

    Makes me think about growing my salt and pepper middle eastern beard. It won’t be as catchy as yours though. Keep bearding.

  3. Genghis Khan says:

    After the Times Square bomber was revealed to be a Muslim, my Muslim wife fumed “Don’t these a-holes know they’re giving the rest of us a bad name?”

    Instead of criticizing people for looking at your appearance and being concerned, why aren’t you fuming at the Jihadists who create the need on the part of people concerned with their safety to be suspicious of you?

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