April 24, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Renowned rabbi discusses the role of religion in American policy -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

UMass baseball haunted by missed opportunities in 8-5 loss -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

‘Transcendence’ a fumbling cautionary tale -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Freedom of speech for campus employees -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

‘Veep’ continues to be one of the smartest comedies around -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

‘Noah’ a sinking ship -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Letter: A response to ‘There is nothing to debate about global warming’ -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Push for punishment equality -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

UMass baseball lacks aggressiveness, misses opportunities in loss -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Police Log Friday, April 18 – Sunday, April 20, 2014 -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

UMass student spends spring break studying sustainability abroad -

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Boston Marathon 2014: A day to remember -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

UMass baseball falls short in second straight Beanpot final -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Fashion faux-pas to fend off at music festivals -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The meaning of Easter -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Is Beyoncé a ‘fashion queen’ or just The Queen? -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Protect Our Breasts holds Earth Day Yogathon -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

UMass holds annual Native American Powwow -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Israel a hub for diversity -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

UMass rowing earns five first place finishes on Friday, two on Saturday in weekend action -

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Letter to the editor

To the editor:

Viewing clear photos of the Boston Marathon attack suspects made me happy and relieved about their appearance. Why?

After the Muslim prayer was not heard, ‘God please let them not be Muslim; God please let them not be Muslim,’ and the guys turned out to be Muslim, I was praying that ‘God let them be without beard; God please let them be without beard.’ Great! They were white and without beards. I am a Middle Easterner and grow a black beard, a very black one; it has the potential to make people suspicious of me even though my beard is short and trimmed, unlike the Talibanic one. Now that they are not bearded I can keep my beautiful beard without need to shave it.

I have lived in the Valley for five years and I did not come across any racial problems. These days, however, when I walk in downtown Amherst or Northampton, I am suspicious of people looking at me; if it were before, I would say it is because of my handsome, very handsome beard. But after the marathon tragedy, their looks toward black-bearded Middle Easterners seem different. Someone looks at me and I think: What do those people think about me? Do they consider me responsible for these acts of terror? Do they think my black beard makes me capable of such violence too; if not now, perhaps later?

Now that we know the guys were not bearded, I can keep my black scruff and go back to interpreting people’s stares as if they were looking at a very handsome bearded gentleman.

Mohsen Jalali

 

Comments
3 Responses to “Letter to the editor”
  1. Kris says:

    Keep on beardin’.

  2. Khepel says:

    Makes me think about growing my salt and pepper middle eastern beard. It won’t be as catchy as yours though. Keep bearding.

  3. Genghis Khan says:

    After the Times Square bomber was revealed to be a Muslim, my Muslim wife fumed “Don’t these a-holes know they’re giving the rest of us a bad name?”

    Instead of criticizing people for looking at your appearance and being concerned, why aren’t you fuming at the Jihadists who create the need on the part of people concerned with their safety to be suspicious of you?

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