July 24, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

UMass Rowing finishes NCAA Championships, ends year ranked No. 21 in the nation -

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Two UMass basketball alums to compete for a lofty prize in The Basketball Tournament -

Friday, May 23, 2014

Commencement Photos 2014 -

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Two arrested in relation to series of vandalism -

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Students push for relocation of the Center for Counseling and Psychological Health -

Monday, May 12, 2014

Video: No. 14 UMass WLAX ends season in loss to Loyola (MD) -

Saturday, May 10, 2014

No. 14 UMass women’s lacrosse season ends in loss to Loyola (MD) -

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Sixth inning rally propels UMass past Dayton 7-2 -

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

McMahon, Ferris and McGovern: Not your usual transfer story -

Sunday, May 4, 2014

Women’s lacrosse defeats Richmond 10-6 to win sixth straight A-10 Championship -

Sunday, May 4, 2014

No. 13 UMass women’s lacrosse knocks off Duquesne 16-3 to reach Atlantic 10 finals -

Friday, May 2, 2014

UMass one of 55 schools currently facing investigation over handling of sexual assault cases -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Two thefts reported at library -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Senior Columns 2013-2014 -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

UMass Dining proposes major meal plan changes -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

UMass baseball beats UConn for first time since 2007 -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

MTV’s seemingly controversial new show proves to be ‘Faking It’ -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Millennials aren’t so bad

Lazy, narcissistic, idle, lost.

Cade Belise/ Collegian

These are all words used to describe the Millennial Generation, also called Gen Y: the group of people born between the early 1980s and the year 2000. In other words, our generation.

It’s easy to click tongues and shake heads in disapproval at our generation, seeing as it is characterized by the great recession and its result in college graduates moving back in with their parents homes for long term durations. But these generalizations made primarily by members of older generations, eclipse a more important characteristic of Millennials: our tenacious optimism of the future, despite bleak prospects.

Many articles about Millennials regard this generation as the new “Lost Generation,” a term coined by the writer Gertrude Stein concerning the bitter disillusionment experienced after World War I. We may be accumulating college debts without the guarantee of being able to pay them back. We may be stalled by the tough job markets from the recession. But we are not lost. In fact, we are the opposite. We know exactly what we want to do. We want to make a positive impact on the world.

A reoccurring criticism of the Millennial Generation is its inflated sense of self-worth and high expectations for careers as a result. In the Psychology Today article “Is Gen Y Becoming the New ‘Lost Generation?’” Gen. Y expert Bruce Tulgan slams the Millennials as “a pampered and nurtured generation, being both high performance and high maintenance, with a very high sense of self-worth.” As a result, some commentators argue, young adults are turning down available jobs that don’t line up with their expectations.

Our desire to positively impact the world is not a consequence of our inflated sense of self. According to Dan Schawbel’s “74 of the Most Interesting Facts about the Millennial Generation,” 41 percent of Millennials “do what their managers tell them to do, which is greater than older generations.” Schawbel’s article also notes that “Millennials say they do not deserve special treatment and are equally as committed as non-Millennials.”

Millennials do not have a sense of high self-worth, but they do have a general distrust of large corporations and feelings of responsibility towards the world. According to the same article, 92 percent of Millennials believe a company’s worth should be measured by more than just profit and that 84 percent believe that making a positive change is more important than professional success. That does not seem like a group of people with a high sense of self entitlement. That is a group of people with great awareness of social responsibility.

As for our being lazy, we are on our way to being the most educated generation in American history, according to Pew Research. As college applications become more cutthroat, high-school students now work harder than ever to get into colleges. Yet, the Millennial Generation has the greatest percentage of college attendees.

Despite our unfavorable economic conditions and great accumulation of student loan debt, despite having to hold off moving to our own homes and starting our own families, 88 percent of Millennials are optimistic about finding a job. That does not sound like a Lost Generation. If we were the next Lost Generation, we would not have as much faith in the future as we do.

Those who look at our generation with disdain should take a closer look. You will find that the Millennials are full of hard-working, innovative and optimistic people who stubbornly refuse to give up on the future.

Maral Margossian is a Collegian columnist and can be reached at mmargossian@umass.edu.

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