Scrolling Headlines:

REPORT: Tom Masella out as defensive coordinator for UMass football -

January 19, 2017

Zach Lewis, bench carry UMass men’s basketball in win over St. Joe’s -

January 19, 2017

UMass women’s basketball handles Duquesne at home -

January 16, 2017

UMass men’s basketball’s late comeback falls short after blowing 15-point first-half lead -

January 15, 2017

UMass hockey outlasted at home against No. 6 UMass Lowell -

January 14, 2017

Hailey Leidel hits second buzzer beater of the season to give UMass women’s basketball win over Davidson -

January 13, 2017

UMass football hosts Maine at Fenway Park in 2017 -

January 12, 2017

UMass men’s basketball snaps losing streak and upsets Dayton Wednesday night at Mullins Center -

January 11, 2017

UMass women’s track and field takes second at Dartmouth Relays -

January 10, 2017

UMass hockey falls to No. 5 Boston University at Frozen Fenway -

January 8, 2017

UMass professor to make third appearance on ‘Jeopardy!’ -

January 8, 2017

UMass women’s basketball suffers brutal loss on road against Saint Joseph’s -

January 7, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops thirds straight, falls to VCU 81-64 -

January 7, 2017

UMass men’s basketball drops tightly-contested conference matchup against George Mason Wednesday night -

January 4, 2017

Late-game defense preserves UMass women’s basketball’s win against rival Rhode Island -

January 4, 2017

AIC shuts out UMass hockey 3-0 at Mullins Center -

January 4, 2017

UMass professor to appear as contestant on ‘Jeopardy!’ Thursday night -

January 4, 2017

Penalties plague UMass hockey in Mariucci Classic championship game -

January 2, 2017

UMass men’s basketball falls in A-10 opener to St. Bonaventure and its veteran backcourt -

December 30, 2016

UMass woman’s basketball ends FIU Holiday Classic with 65-47 loss to Drexel -

December 29, 2016

Millennials aren’t so bad

Lazy, narcissistic, idle, lost.

Cade Belisle/ Collegian

These are all words used to describe the Millennial Generation, also called Gen Y: the group of people born between the early 1980s and the year 2000. In other words, our generation.

It’s easy to click tongues and shake heads in disapproval at our generation, seeing as it is characterized by the great recession and its result in college graduates moving back in with their parents homes for long term durations. But these generalizations made primarily by members of older generations, eclipse a more important characteristic of Millennials: our tenacious optimism of the future, despite bleak prospects.

Many articles about Millennials regard this generation as the new “Lost Generation,” a term coined by the writer Gertrude Stein concerning the bitter disillusionment experienced after World War I. We may be accumulating college debts without the guarantee of being able to pay them back. We may be stalled by the tough job markets from the recession. But we are not lost. In fact, we are the opposite. We know exactly what we want to do. We want to make a positive impact on the world.

A reoccurring criticism of the Millennial Generation is its inflated sense of self-worth and high expectations for careers as a result. In the Psychology Today article “Is Gen Y Becoming the New ‘Lost Generation?’” Gen. Y expert Bruce Tulgan slams the Millennials as “a pampered and nurtured generation, being both high performance and high maintenance, with a very high sense of self-worth.” As a result, some commentators argue, young adults are turning down available jobs that don’t line up with their expectations.

Our desire to positively impact the world is not a consequence of our inflated sense of self. According to Dan Schawbel’s “74 of the Most Interesting Facts about the Millennial Generation,” 41 percent of Millennials “do what their managers tell them to do, which is greater than older generations.” Schawbel’s article also notes that “Millennials say they do not deserve special treatment and are equally as committed as non-Millennials.”

Millennials do not have a sense of high self-worth, but they do have a general distrust of large corporations and feelings of responsibility towards the world. According to the same article, 92 percent of Millennials believe a company’s worth should be measured by more than just profit and that 84 percent believe that making a positive change is more important than professional success. That does not seem like a group of people with a high sense of self entitlement. That is a group of people with great awareness of social responsibility.

As for our being lazy, we are on our way to being the most educated generation in American history, according to Pew Research. As college applications become more cutthroat, high-school students now work harder than ever to get into colleges. Yet, the Millennial Generation has the greatest percentage of college attendees.

Despite our unfavorable economic conditions and great accumulation of student loan debt, despite having to hold off moving to our own homes and starting our own families, 88 percent of Millennials are optimistic about finding a job. That does not sound like a Lost Generation. If we were the next Lost Generation, we would not have as much faith in the future as we do.

Those who look at our generation with disdain should take a closer look. You will find that the Millennials are full of hard-working, innovative and optimistic people who stubbornly refuse to give up on the future.

Maral Margossian is a Collegian columnist and can be reached at mmargossian@umass.edu.

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