January 28, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

MASSPIRG urges McDonalds to stop purchasing meat raised with antibiotics -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

How to avoid, treat and prevent Computer Vision Syndrome as a college student. -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Narendra Modi and the US forge strengthening ties -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

UMass receives research honor from the Carnegie Foundation -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Islamophobia is a form of racism that needs to be stopped -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Björk gets personal on breakup album, ‘Vulnicura’ -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

UMass Dining nominated for Seafood Champion Award -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Why UMass basketball isn’t a good brand of basketball -

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

BLOG: Joseph Widmar commits to UMass hockey -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

BLOG: New York Jets name Marcel Shipp new running backs coach -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

A bond over basketball: Trey Davis and Zach Coleman’s friendship continues to grow at UMass -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Inside the Park with Marky Mark: January 27, 2015 -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Panda Bear remains confident, even in the face of ‘The Grim Reaper’ -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Why I want to be a teacher -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams wrap up third-place finishes at Dartmouth Invitational -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

UMass’ College of Education to train Pakistani higher education administrators -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Hao Luong shines for UMass men’s swimming and diving on Senior Day, prepares for end of college career -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Police Log: Friday, Jan. 23, 2015 to Monday, Jan. 26, 2015 -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Rachel Hilliard, Heather MacLean highlight solid performance from UMass women’s track and field -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Hockey East: Eichel’s overtime goal pushes Boston University past Vermont -

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

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Click here to visit UMass Dining

Stand against street harassment

I was walking in front of Morrill in broad daylight, wearing a red dress and just minding my own business when a group of three guys walked by. One of them turned to me as he passed, looked me up and down, and sneered, “Hello, Little Red! Are you still afraid of the big bad wolf?”

Mitchell Scuzzarella/ Collegian File Photo

I was too shocked to respond then but, now, I have an answer.

I have never seen a wolf before and, no, the idea of one doesn’t scare me. What does scare me is the fact that, as a woman, I apparently cannot walk down a public street without receiving unwelcomed harassment.

I still remember the first time I experienced this type of situation. I was twelve years old and had decided to go running, a first for me. Jogging down the street, I was shocked when a car slowed down just long enough for its driver to yell “Slut!” at me.

I was really still just a child when this happened. I still played with Polly Pockets. I was certainly not a “slut.”

The actions are categorized as street harassment, which the organization Stop Street Harassment defines as “any action or comment between strangers in public places that is disrespectful, unwelcomed, threatening, and/or harassing and is motivated by gender or sexual orientation.”

My story is certainly not the only one that has occurred here in Amherst. In an informal survey I conducted of 70 people, 86 percent reported that they have been the victims of street harassment, with 60 percent reporting having experienced it on multiple occasions. My survey also included 11 men, since street harassment is not always exclusively experienced by women.

Participants reported incidents that ranged from being beeped at, to catcalled, to being physically groped, to even having their butts slapped. All of these experiences were in public places such as the bus, the T and even just on the street. One participant wrote that it “makes you feel uncomfortable when you are walking around campus.”

A positive movement against street harassment is called Hollaback, which encourages victims from all over the world to share their stories and to react. Hollaback affirms everyone’s right to be “a person who never has to take it or just keep walking, but one who has a … response when they are messed with [and] someone who knows they have the right to define themselves instead of being defined by some creep’s point of view.”

The problem with street harassment is that it is not often reported because it can happen within seconds, but that doesn’t mean we have to accept it. On top of trying to teach victims how to react, Hollaback points out the need for a reassessment of the societal attitudes that allow this behavior to occur.

Street harassment is part of a larger societal issue known as rape culture. The University of Minnesota defines rape culture as “a culture in which rape is prevalent and pervasive and is sanctioned and maintained through fundamental attitudes and beliefs about gender, sexuality and violence.”

The respondents of my survey described harassment that was threatening and sexually violent in nature. Street harassment often sexually objectifies women. The men that take part in these actions may be “just joking,” but their attitudes reflect disrespectful attitudes towards women that are inherent to rape culture.

Such attitudes have dangerous consequences. According to statistics from the website One in Four, 25 percent of college women report having survived a rape or attempted rape. 42 percent of these survivors have told no one that it happened. With statistics so high, fighting street harassment is just the beginning of a much larger battle that must be fought.

It is important for everyone, men and women, to stand against such harassment and to react when we see it occurring, even if it is not happening to us. If more people react, then the people that do the harassing will start feeling the pressure to stop. By raising awareness of these issues, perhaps we can change society’s perception of street harassment and rape culture as a whole.

All people have the right to walk down the streets without being catcalled or yelled at. We need to reject the excuses that people are “just kidding” or “didn’t mean it.” Women are not sluts, hoes, whores or any other derogatory name, and we will not accept being referred to as such. It is time to take a stand against street harassment and demand the respect that we, as human beings, deserve.

Molly Gately is a Collegian contributor and can be reached at megately@umass.edu.

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