Scrolling Headlines:

Amazon textbook contract ending in December 2018 -

October 19, 2017

UMass field hockey heads into crucial A-10 matchup -

October 19, 2017

2017 Hockey Special Issue -

October 19, 2017

International Relations Club tackles tough issues at ‘Foreign Policy Coffee Hour’ -

October 19, 2017

Sexual assault reports spike on campus -

October 19, 2017

Californian students react to wildfires back home -

October 19, 2017

‘My Little Pony: The Movie’ is a surprising animated treat, whether you’re a fan of the show or not -

October 19, 2017

With a young team, Carvel is preparing the UMass hockey team to thrive -

October 19, 2017

Letter: UMass hockey is great, but where are the students? -

October 19, 2017

Boino’s blast gives UMass men’s soccer sole possession of first place in the Atlantic 10 -

October 19, 2017

UMass freshmen look to play physical, make an impact and improve early on -

October 19, 2017

UMass hockey sets out to create new program, identity in 2017-18 -

October 19, 2017

Cale Makar: UMass hockey’s crown jewel -

October 19, 2017

Ames: If first four games are any indicator, this UMass hockey season could differ for the better -

October 19, 2017

Josh Couturier looks to find where he fits within UMass lineup -

October 19, 2017

The straw man fallacy: missing the point on Indigenous Peoples Day -

October 19, 2017

Power to the Thin Mint: improve the Girls Scouts program -

October 19, 2017

‘Blade Runner 2049’ has a lot of ideas that it fails to develop -

October 19, 2017

Early season challenge awaits for UMass hockey in weekend set with Ohio State -

October 18, 2017

UMass Professor Barbara Krauthamer receives award from Association of Black Women Historians -

October 18, 2017

UMass announces new School of Earth and Sustainability

(Daily Collegian Archives)

(Daily Collegian Archives)

The University of Massachusetts announced the creation of a new School of Earth and Sustainability (SES) last week. Curt Griffin, current head of the department of environmental conservation, will serve as the school’s first director. SES is a partnership within the College of Natural Sciences between the Department of Environmental Conservation, Department of Geosciences and the Stockbridge School of Agriculture.

According to a University press release, the Board of Trustees approved the school on April 13.

SES will encompass the 18 undergraduate and five graduate programs that already exist within the environmental conservation and geosciences departments, as well as the Stockbridge School of Agriculture, Griffin said. These programs are comprised of more than a thousand students and 70 faculty members, he said.

Griffin added that the creation of the new school allows for the “opportunity to establish new undergraduate and graduate programs” and to “better facilitate collaboration between departments.”

Plans for School of Earth and Sustainability have been in the works since 2012, according to Griffin, who said he worked closely with the Faculty Senate, Office of the Provost and Dean of the College of Natural Sciences office.

The shift of these programs into a new school was driven by growing student interest in environmental sciences and sustainability, Griffin said. The campus itself has a growing interest in sustainability. More than 300 classes “with that stamp” are offered to UMass students, he added.

He explained that these “wicked challenges” the world faces in terms of climate change and the environment are interdisciplinary, and so the solutions must also be interdisciplinary. For him, SES is a place for just that – interdisciplinary study.

Griffin outlined two short-term goals for the new school. The first is to provide students with better professional training. The plans are being finalized to give students practical professional experience while in the program and to link students with the school’s partners and future employers.

The second goal is marketing to increase awareness of SES. Griffin said, “We want people to know about the incredible wealth of opportunities here.”

Griffin, a wildlife ecologist himself, still finds time to stand in front of a classroom during the semester; calling himself “passionate about teaching.”

He said that one of his favorite parts of teaching is sharing his experiences traveling and conducting research to “fuel (his students’) passion for making a big difference.”

“(I want to) let them make a big impact on the world with the knowledge and training they get here,” Griffin said.

Marie MacCune can be reached at mmaccune@umass.edu and followed on Twitter @MarieMacCune.

Leave A Comment