September 2, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

UMass holds world’s largest clambake -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Pair of UMass seniors set to increase leadership after Koch’s passing -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Remembering Robin Williams -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Racism after dark: Violence in the ‘sundown town’ of Ferguson -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Integrative Learning Center opens for fall semester -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

UMass looks to repeat success despite daunting schedule -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

A fresh start for Blue Wall -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

#BlackLivesMatter: The irony behind “Black-on-Black” crime -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Advertising is all around us, with the help of Big Brother’s data -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Four albums that rocked the summer -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

The sad decline of the American music festival -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

US and allies must eliminate ISIS -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Apple prepares to unveil iPhone 6 -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

UMass field hockey must fill void left by seven graduating seniors -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Seasonal brews and bottles -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

UMass women’s soccer drops home opener -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ is the perfect blend of comedy, superheroes and sci-fi -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Why the media doesn’t handle depression well -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Rao: ‘I like to call myself a walking paradox’ -

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

BC’s methodical rushing attack wears UMass down -

Saturday, August 30, 2014

NASA should not cut ties with Russia

Astronaut James H. Newman waves during a spacewalk preparing for release of the first combined elements of the International Space Station. The Russian-built Zarya module, with its solar array panel visible here, was launched into orbit fifteen years ago on Nov. 20, 1998. Two weeks later, on Dec. 4, 1998, NASA's space shuttle Endeavour launched Unity, the first U.S. piece of the complex. During three spacewalks on the STS-88 mission, the two space modules built on opposite sides of the planet were joined together in space, making the space station truly international. (NASA/MCT)

Johnny McCabe explains why NASA’s decision to cut ties with Russia’s Roscosmos is counterproductive for furthering scientific exploration as well as smoothing out international relations.

NASA scientist discusses water on mars

Flickr/Bluedharma

A NASA scientist visited UMass to discuss the Mars Rover Curiosity mission, which involved laser beams, cameras, drills and, most importantly, water on Mars

The circle of (extraterrestrial) life

Collegian columnist Chelsea Whitton is far from being an astronomer or even a fan of science fiction, but she can’t stop thinking about crop circles. Have the aliens captured her mind?

Send the space-bureaucrats to Mars

In this week’s point-counterpoint, Collegian columnist Harrison Searles tells us why the government should get out of the space-exploration business.

Why we need NASA

Collegian columnist Mike Tudoreanu explores the idea of how despite all the desire for space exploration, the real dream of it all is dying.

Assistant Professor Christopher Condit and team of NASA astronauts in training explore the heavens on earth

UMass geology professor Christopher Condit worked with NASA on its Desert Rats (DRATS) program last summer simulating conditions on the moon and Mars north of Flagstaff, Arizona.