Heaven by Marc Jacobs, for everyone

The collection is as hypnotic as it is experimental

Photo+Courtesy+of+Marc+Jacobs+Official+Facebook+Page

Photo Courtesy of Marc Jacobs Official Facebook Page

By Jackson Walker, Collegian Staff

New York based fashion designer Marc Jacobs has long been known for his simplistic approach to fashion, choosing not to sexualize models and clothing. Jacobs has stated that he rather those who wear Marc Jacobs “…feel hedonistic, [but] they don’t look it.”

The labels latest endeavor, “Heaven,” released its new collection this past September. Since its original launch in September of 2020, the colorful, Y2K inspired line has thrived on its collaborations. Be it animation from Nam Mac, paintings-turned-dresses by Eri Wakiyama and reimaginations of forgotten toys by Dean Hoy, some of the non-wearable sets have been the most interesting. The collaborations have also seen all types of artists tapped for wearable collections, like Swedish rapper Bladee, fashion designer duo Nong Rak and the well-known Doc Martens brand.

The collection by Bladee features some old and some original painted pieces. A bright puffer vest adorned with “Valery Bells” and a zip-up hoodie sporting a circle of flowers around a cross make up some of the hypnotic pieces in this collection.

The line has really de-emphasized this as a high fashion line with its more believable prices, but also with its choice in models. From musicians like Yung Lean and Nicki Minaj, to established actors like Kyle McLachlan and Winona Ryder and even podcasters like Enya Umanzor. The representation across age, race and nationality is nice to see in an industry where it can be lacking.

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Despite being someone who does not own any Marc Jacobs, but has some interest in fashion, this is probably the closest I have kept up with any line from any brand. I would describe my own fashion sense as silly or perhaps even goofy. I think it’s fun to try and put together outfits without really laying it out. Putting each part of it on and trying to imagine what might be the next piece of an outfit I’ll keep wearing for months. There are, of course, many pieces I wear once and then never again — which is the fun of it.

This sort of experimentation is what makes a collection like Heaven appealing to me. I try to buy secondhand clothing as much as I can, because the surprise in what you can find is much like that process of trying to make a new outfit from scratch. Finding something at the thrift or on Depop makes me think about how I can incorporate every new piece into my wardrobe.

With the boom in secondhand fashion and Y2K styled clothing, I think the reemergence of boxy silhouettes is well done in the Heaven campaign. Pants that clump up at the bottom, sweaters a bit too wide and shirts a bit too long are even more fun to style. Additionally, it’s more comfortable to have baggier fits.

So, when I say that I find the Marc Jacobs collection silly and at times goofy, it’s from a place of admiration.

Jackson Walker can be reached at [email protected]