Massachusetts Daily Collegian

Liberal lions don’t die

By Charlie Felder

February 5, 2010


Filed under Columns

“The work goes on, the cause endures, the hope still lives and the dream shall never die.” Ted Kennedy spoke those words upon conceding the 1980 Democratic Presidential nomination to then-President Jimmy Carter. That speech was a barn-burner if ever there was one, and years later, those words rank...

Entering political apathy

By Matthew M. Robare

February 5, 2010


Filed under Columns

Massachusetts ain’t what it used to be. Senator Ted Kennedy, because of his name and his long service, was probably one of the most influential people in Congress for nearly thirty years. But he wasn’t the only famous and influential person from Massachusetts. After World War II, three Representatives...

Our position and Haiti

By Christa Romano

February 4, 2010


Filed under Columns

As I sat in the heated office of the auto shop waiting for the mechanics to finish fixing up my car, a rather large middle-aged woman walked in and started chatting with the man behind the counter. She wasn’t the most refined of women – throwing unnecessary curse words into her vocabulary as she...

How to transform UMass into a more brotherly campus

By Nick Milano

February 4, 2010


Filed under Columns

One of the features that gives aspiring University of Massachusetts applicants pause – I know I was one – is the sheer size of the University. Switching from a high school of perhaps 2,000 students to a college with over 24,000 can be a shock. To combat this impression, different groups on campus...

In memory of Howard Zinn

By Justin Thompson

February 4, 2010


Filed under Columns

He may lie at the opposite end of the political spectrum from where I do, yet no matter what one’s political views are - there is no denying the fact that Howard Zinn was and is one of the single most important figures in contemporary political history. Mr. Zinn died last Wednesday of a heart attack,...

Farewell J.D., We Hardly Knew Ye

By Charlie Felder

February 2, 2010


Filed under Columns, Opinion

Until I was thirteen, I had a tendency to stutter when called upon in class. My mother claims that it had more to do with the fact that I had a minor obsession with old Jimmy Stewart films and less to do with a certain fear of public speaking, as was my teacher’s diagnosis. Either way, my father...

‘Bullying bill’ foolhardy attempt to stop student battles

By Alana Goodman

February 2, 2010


Filed under Columns, Opinion

Up until Jan. 14, Phoebe was a sweet, pretty freshman at South Hadley High School. That was the day she hung herself in her closet after being relentlessly bullied by her fellow students. Tragically, hers isn’t the only recent suicide-by-bully case in Massachusetts. Carl Walker - Hoover of Springfield...

Parties, Parking and the Proletariat

By Ben Sullivan

February 2, 2010


Filed under Columns, Opinion

Robert C. Holub, the Chancellor, the top dog, some people love him, some people hate him. I don’t really know the guy. I do know, however, that while many people don’t want to live anywhere near the UMass campus; he lives right on campus at the Hillside House, a building centered between Orchard...

This truck will be parked here for a while

By Dmitriy Shapiro

February 1, 2010


Filed under Columns

We may never see an election more important than the special one to replace the late Ted Kennedy; it has captured the attention of every political scientist, pundit and blow hard in the country for almost a month. Even the most rabid Republican back in December would not have admitted that his party...

Union: 1, Obama: 0

By Alex Perry

February 1, 2010


Filed under Columns

Barack Obama set out to restore the American public's wavering confidence and trust both in him and in government during his State of the Union address on Wednesday, but all the President really did was raise the question of how such an eloquent orator could be such a terribly confused leader. Many...

The best of both worlds

By Nick O'Malley

February 1, 2010


Filed under Columns

Blackrock Castle Observatory, built in the 16th Century, sits just a couple kilometers outside of the city of Cork. Constructed in an effort to ward off pirates, the structure is one of many area landmarks that has survived for hundreds of years. Visitors to the castle can witness the observatory,...

Connecting to Caulfield

By Mike Fox

February 1, 2010


Filed under Columns

One opinion that I’ve heard repeated ad nauseam is the idea that requiring someone to read a book dampens their opinion of it. So of course, we go through high school being forced to read a number of fantastic books, but because we had to do some asinine assignment while reading them, our enjoyment...