Scrolling Headlines:

UMass men’s soccer look to surprise the Atlantic 10 conference for the second consecutive season -

September 30, 2016

Third and 20 S2 Episode 8 -

September 29, 2016

Author, poet and ex-con gives talk on criminal justice reform -

September 29, 2016

Israeli writer Ari Shavit speaks at Integrative Learning Center -

September 29, 2016

Alex DeSantis continues strong play for UMass men’s soccer as season reaches midway point -

September 29, 2016

Andrew Ford looks to continue to lead UMass football’s torrid offensive passing attack -

September 29, 2016

Sunset Grill and Pizza adjusts as a new restaurant in Amherst -

September 29, 2016

UMass field hockey falls 8-1 to No. 1 UConn -

September 29, 2016

Offensive-oriented practices hold high hopes for UMass women’s soccer with A-10 opener Thursday -

September 29, 2016

Hyper-stress on college campuses: a culture of high achievement leads to increased rates of mental illnesses -

September 29, 2016

Race of candidates should not affect voter turnout -

September 29, 2016

Students share what keeps them happy during the fall -

September 29, 2016

Harvest’s millennial-pandering replacement to Chameleon Cold Brew leaves caffeine fans at a loss -

September 29, 2016

Guide to fall 5K races and beyond -

September 29, 2016

UMass Votes Coalition hosts voter registration event -

September 28, 2016

Brettell presents on U.S. immigration policies -

September 28, 2016

UMass field hockey team seeks revenge against undefeated UConn -

September 28, 2016

UMass running back Marquis Young looks to build off momentum gained against Mississippi State -

September 28, 2016

UMass hockey announces captains for 2016-17 season -

September 28, 2016

Andy Isabella finds his niche within the UMass football offense -

September 28, 2016

Harvard newspaper outrages jewish community

On September 8, the community of Harvard University opened their newspaper with a unanimous sense of horror. Within The Crimson, Harvard’s daily newspaper, was an advertisement for the Committee for the Open Debate on the Holocaust, a group that questions the existence of the Holocaust.

In said advertisement, faculty and students are asked, “can you provide, with proof, the name of one person killed in a gas chamber at Auschwitz?”

After the ad appeared, The Crimson received emails from community members, students and a petition signed by numerous editors of The Crimson. The Harvard Hillel requested that the newspaper print an apology letter. President Jason Child published “A Letter to Crimson Readers”. The letter addresses the sensitivity of this particular issue. Child also said in the letter that the newspaper does not support such views. Despite The Crimson printing this article to apologize, never is an apology directly stated, rather the newspaper blamed the advertisement being printed as a miscommunication amongst the newspaper’s staff members.

The Crimson has stated that this was an accident, a communication error which occurred during a three-week break allowing this advertisement to print. After a discussion among editors, it was decided that the ad would not be published.

Child cites the reason as to why this advertisement was printed as a failure to communicate to the entire staff the decision not to run the ad. Yet with the hours spent on layout, editing and formatting a newspaper it is hard to believe that no one would catch an anti-Semitic advertisement on page 7.

When asked for comment on the apology letter, James E. Young the chair of the Department of Judaic & Near Eastern Studies at University of Massachusetts stated, “The editor should not be apologizing for an “accident” but for his own incompetence as an editor, whose job is to know the difference between informed observation and propaganda.”

Michelle Williams can be reached at mnwillia@student.umass.edu.

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