Scrolling Headlines:

Campus Climate survey shows strong response -

December 7, 2016

Jennifer Carlson gives talk on race and gun law enforcement -

December 7, 2016

Labor Center to receive increased funding from University -

December 7, 2016

Verdi enforces playing a full 40 minutes as UMass takes on Hofstra -

December 7, 2016

Mulligan looks to continue seven game double-double streak at Hofstra -

December 7, 2016

Jesus: the conservative Republican -

December 7, 2016

The joy of Snapchat -

December 7, 2016

Don’t let hate defeat debate -

December 7, 2016

‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ remains the defining holiday classic -

December 7, 2016

A Tribe Called Quest bid its fans a thoughtful farewell -

December 7, 2016

Amherst residents rally against Dakota pipeline in water ceremony outside TD Bank -

December 6, 2016

Laura Reed discusses nuclear disarmament under Obama Administration -

December 6, 2016

SGA President announces opening of vice president position -

December 6, 2016

Four UMass divers qualify for NCAA Tournament at Bucknell Invitational this weekend -

December 6, 2016

Top 25 Basketball Notebook: UCLA pulls off major upset over Kentucky -

December 6, 2016

College football playoff seeds came out Sunday; Alabama gets top seed -

December 6, 2016

UMass club hockey comes out of travel weekend 1-1-1 -

December 6, 2016

Notebook: UMass men’s basketball guard Luwane Pipkins among nation’s best in steals -

December 6, 2016

Listen when you argue to truly understand -

December 6, 2016

Letter to the Editor: local veterans on Hampshire flag burning -

December 6, 2016

Harvard newspaper outrages jewish community

On September 8, the community of Harvard University opened their newspaper with a unanimous sense of horror. Within The Crimson, Harvard’s daily newspaper, was an advertisement for the Committee for the Open Debate on the Holocaust, a group that questions the existence of the Holocaust.

In said advertisement, faculty and students are asked, “can you provide, with proof, the name of one person killed in a gas chamber at Auschwitz?”

After the ad appeared, The Crimson received emails from community members, students and a petition signed by numerous editors of The Crimson. The Harvard Hillel requested that the newspaper print an apology letter. President Jason Child published “A Letter to Crimson Readers”. The letter addresses the sensitivity of this particular issue. Child also said in the letter that the newspaper does not support such views. Despite The Crimson printing this article to apologize, never is an apology directly stated, rather the newspaper blamed the advertisement being printed as a miscommunication amongst the newspaper’s staff members.

The Crimson has stated that this was an accident, a communication error which occurred during a three-week break allowing this advertisement to print. After a discussion among editors, it was decided that the ad would not be published.

Child cites the reason as to why this advertisement was printed as a failure to communicate to the entire staff the decision not to run the ad. Yet with the hours spent on layout, editing and formatting a newspaper it is hard to believe that no one would catch an anti-Semitic advertisement on page 7.

When asked for comment on the apology letter, James E. Young the chair of the Department of Judaic & Near Eastern Studies at University of Massachusetts stated, “The editor should not be apologizing for an “accident” but for his own incompetence as an editor, whose job is to know the difference between informed observation and propaganda.”

Michelle Williams can be reached at mnwillia@student.umass.edu.

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