Scrolling Headlines:

The Collegian live tweets Boston Calling -

May 28, 2016

UMass baseball finishes season with sweep over George Mason -

May 22, 2016

UMass women’s lacrosse falls in NCAA quarterfinal -

May 22, 2016

‘Green Room’ is a bloody blast of survival horror -

May 21, 2016

DaLuz: Boston Celtics stuck trudging in the mud -

May 18, 2016

Despite tallying double-digit hits, UMass baseball falls to Fairfield Tuesday afternoon -

May 17, 2016

Radiohead returns to the top with gorgeous, illuminating ‘A Moon Shaped Pool’ -

May 16, 2016

UMass women’s lacrosse advances to quarterfinal of NCAA tournament -

May 16, 2016

UMass baseball outlasts Rhode Island in series finale behind strong pitching of Brandon Walsh -

May 15, 2016

Eileen McDonald’s overtime goal advances UMass women’s lacrosse in NCAA tournament -

May 14, 2016

12 UMass students face possible arrests in connection to an alleged bad LSD trip -

May 14, 2016

UMass baseball falls in first-ever Division I matchup with UMass Lowell 7-3 -

May 11, 2016

UMass baseball gets shut out in nonconference matchup with UConn -

May 10, 2016

UMass women’s lacrosse tops Richmond, wins eighth straight Atlantic 10 championship -

May 9, 2016

UMass baseball salvages last game of weekend series with Richmond behind strong eighth inning -

May 9, 2016

UMass women’s lacrosse beats St. Joe’s, advance to Atlantic 10 championship game -

May 7, 2016

Lack of offense plagues UMass baseball in game two of doubleheader with Fordham -

May 1, 2016

UMass women’s lacrosse tops Davidson 12-5 on Senior Day -

May 1, 2016

Two arrested after report of aggravated robbery in Washington Hall last night -

May 1, 2016

Former UMass wide receiver Tajae Sharpe selected in fifth round of 2016 NFL Draft -

April 30, 2016

And so begin the Jewish High Holidays

The start of the new semester at the University of Massachusetts is a time of optimism and renewal. This year especially brings several exciting changes to campus life: the renovated Campus Center has a newfound glow, Late Night at the dining commons is an indulgence now available seven days a wee and we have a promising new chancellor with some smooth dance moves.

The Jewish High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur conveniently fall around this time of new beginnings. Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, began last night, while Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, follows 10 days thereafter. Complete with special services, festive meals and lack thereof, the High Holidays are among the most widely observed on the Jewish calendar and are filled with tradition and significance.

For food, apple slices dipped in honey are the quintessential Rosh Hashanah appetizer, meant to symbolize the sweetness of the year ahead. This dish is delicious so long as the apple slices do not turn brown by the time they are served. This is a legitimate concern as the meal is often delayed by excessive familial gushing over how much you have grown since your Bar/Bat Mitzvah. Mixing the apples with orange juice beforehand usually does the trick.

Another important element of the Rosh Hashanah service is the blowing of the Shofar, the ram’s horn whose resonant sound was used as a call to assembly in ancient Israel. On Rosh Hashanah, however, the Shofar’s ominous tone serves as a reminder of one’s obligation to reflect on the past year.

The task of blowing the Shofar is assigned to a member of the congregation with exceptional lung capacity, and for good reason: following a series of short toots, the Shofar-blowing routine culminates in one final note that lasts until the blower literally runs out of breath. The poor congregant’s face unfailingly resembles a tomato by the time they complete the grueling task.

Another Rosh Hashanah tradition is Tashlich, which translates as “casting away,” and is performed on the afternoon of Rosh Hashanah by taking a pleasant stroll to a nearby body of flowing water, such as a river or stream. The tradition involves symbolically casting away one’s sins by throwing stale bread crumbs into the water. The ducks immediately flock to this complimentary annual feast.

Teshuvah is the Hebrew word for repentance. In the 10 days that separate the two holidays, known as the Yamim Noraim, or Days of Awe, it is traditional to reflect on the wrong-doings one has committed to others over the past year and to reconcile them via a personal verbal apology.

For the “Mean Girls” fans out there, this may evoke the image of superficial high school girls making ridiculous public confessions (“Gretchen, I’m sorry I laughed at you that time you got diarrhea at Barnes & Nobles. And I’m sorry for telling everyone about it. And I’m sorry for repeating it now.”) The apologies exchanged during the Days of Awe (hopefully) carry more weight and sincerity. The Ten Days of Awe culminate in the grand finale of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, which is the most critical Fast Day on the Jewish calendar. As its name suggests, Yom Kippur is a day designed to atone for one’s sins over the past year – yet unlike the practice of interpersonal apologies performed during the Ten Days of Awe, this atonement is meant to be achieved internally.

It is customary to wear white on Yom Kippur as a symbol of spiritual purity, and the service contains especially slow and mournful melodies that establish the day’s somber tone.

After a full day of prayer and introspection, the ultimate gratification comes, of course, from the much-awaited break-fast in the evening. Bagels are usually included.

And that concludes my preview of the Jewish High Holidays – Shana Tova to all!

Merav Kaufman is a Collegian columnist. She can be reached at merav@student.umass.edu.

Leave A Comment