September 1, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

BC’s methodical rushing attack wears UMass down -

Saturday, August 30, 2014

UMass football dominated as Boston College rolls to a 30-7 victory -

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Arrest made after lewd acts on campus -

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Suspect in custody after break-ins on Lincoln Avenue -

Thursday, August 28, 2014

UMass crime alerts reveal reports of lewd acts -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass women’s soccer hopes added depth brings more consistency in 2014 -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass mourns death of alumnus and journalist James Foley -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Kassan Messiah, Trey Seals to shoulder pass rushing responsibility for UMass football -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

UMass names Blake Frohnapfel as the starting quarterback -

Monday, August 18, 2014

Decision looms for Mark Whipple as UMass football looks to name starting quarterback -

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Former UMass star Marcel Shipp overseeing a strong running back competition -

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Former UMass basketball star Chaz Williams signs professional contract in Turkey, still eyeing NBA career -

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Minutemen anxious to display aggressive defense -

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

UMass football turns the page, excited for 2014 season -

Monday, August 4, 2014

UMass student struck and killed by vehicle Thursday night -

Friday, August 1, 2014

UMass receives anonymous $10.3 million gift -

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

UMass football summer coverage 2014 -

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Stephen Lynch releases two-disc comedy album

Among the most well-known figures in the musical comedy community, Stephen Lynch has recently put out his seventh release, a two-disc effort of his signature brand of acoustic guitar-driven hilarity.

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Titled “Lion,” the album includes one disc of studio recordings and another of a live show in which he performs each of the new songs.

Among the funniest aspects of the album is how unexpectedly beautiful the music actually sounds; if “Lion” was playing in a bookstore or other quiet setting, listeners may completely overlook the lyrical content, lost in the finely-crafted vocal harmonies by Lynch and guest vocalist Courtney Jaye.

It’s crucial to maintain a sense of humor when listening to much of Lynch’s work. Those who are easily offended may find it considerably less enjoyable as Lynch humorously sings about subjects like sex and dysfunctional relationships, and, though it is obviously not meant to offend, he occasionally lacks political correctness.

In past releases, Lynch’s recordings have been far less well-produced; they included primarily his voice and guitar with few added effects, bare bones when compared to the production value “Lion” boasts.

The album opens with “Tattoo,” a quiet yet upbeat-sounding song about the various types of common embarrassing tattoos. Jaye’s harmonies add a lot of humor to the song; her voice is made for alternative-pop and is undeniably pretty, yet she is using it to harmonize with lines like “Your child’s name with the words ‘be strong’ would be beautiful, but they spelled ‘strong’ wrong.”

A few songs later, “Lorelai,” a piano-driven tune about a few women with defects such as a lazy eye and unusual body odor, turns into a ballad of sorts. An organ makes a subtle entrance, giving it a subtle blues feel. While musically the song is enjoyable, it falls short lyrically as Lynch’s humor falls flat.

One highlight on the album is the title track, a musical duel between two men for the heart of a woman. Lynch has done a similar duet in the past; “Best Friend Song” featured Lynch’s friend Mark Teich and also highlighted differences between the two singers, ending with Lynch scream-singing that he wanted to sleep with Teich’s young sister. “Lion” has a poppy, sing-along feel to it.

Most songs on the album are slow-and-sleepy, sung in an almost lullaby-like voice to little more than Lynch’s own acoustic guitar. The song “The Night I Laid You Down” is another duet, again featuring Jaye.

The rest of the album flows in a similar fashion and is peppered with banjos, harmonicas and cello, to name a few added musical elements.

While “Lion” is a perfectly enjoyable album, it is comically disappointing when compared to Lynch’s previous work. To put it simply, it doesn’t hit the mark that Lynch has set for himself, and isn’t on the same level as releases like “Superhero,” a live album released by the artist in 2003.

“Lion” noticeably lacks the fast-paced zingers that Lynch fans often find stuck in their heads, and while the jokes are funny to a certain degree, they are seldom laugh-out-loud funny.

The songs on which Jaye are featured are definite highlights on “Lion” as she is an unexpected addition to Lynch’s blend of musical comedy. She and Lynch are equally funny on these songs and complement each other tremendously.

Overall, “Lion” is only a good album. Lynch’s sense of humor remains the same, but he doesn’t seem to have quite as much fun as he has in the past. It is musically beautiful, but falls flat comically.

Ellie Rulon-Miller can be reached at ellie@dailycollegian.com.

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