Scrolling Headlines:

Adam Liccardi found guilty in UMass rape trial -

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Jackson Porter adapting well following switch to wide receiver -

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Minutemen look for Robert Kitching to anchor defensive line -

Monday, August 31, 2015

Closing arguments delivered in Adam Liccardi rape trial -

Monday, August 31, 2015

Early goals sink UMass men’s soccer in loss to Saint Peter’s -

Monday, August 31, 2015

UMass field hockey splits weekend matches with UNH and BU -

Sunday, August 30, 2015

UMass women’s soccer struck by injuries, struggles offensively as it falls to No. 24 Rutgers -

Sunday, August 30, 2015

UMass men’s soccer drops season opener to Utah Valley in overtime -

Friday, August 28, 2015

UMass football notebook: Jackson Porter moves to WR, UMass schedules 2016 game with South Carolina -

Friday, August 28, 2015

Former UMass student who accused four men of rape in 2012 testifies during trial Friday -

Friday, August 28, 2015

REPORT: UMass football’s Da’Sean Downey faces two assault charges in connection with February fight -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

UMass football Media Day: Catching up with Joe Colton -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Creating turnovers, forcing mistakes the focus for linebacking corps -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Jurors hear police interview, read text messages by defendants in third UMass rape trial -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

‘Living at UMass’ app aims to make move-in weekend a breeze -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass rape trial halts abruptly, opening statements delivered Tuesday -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Jamal Wilson returns from injury with confidence he is ‘main guy’ at running back -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Freshmen Sekai Lindsay, Andy Isabella impressing at running back -

Monday, August 24, 2015

UMass ranked in top 25 for LGBTQ students -

Monday, August 24, 2015

UMass football fall camp day five: Rodney Mills looks to continue bringing versatility to tight end position -

Friday, August 21, 2015

Amherst Town Meeting bans Styrofoam

Flickr/ehud42

Restaurants in Amherst that use Styrofoam containers will soon have to find an alternative to the product after members of Amherst’s Town Meeting voted last month to ban the material, beginning in 2014.

The ban comes after news of health and environmental risks associated with the material, which is also known as expanded polystyrene.

One of the key ingredients in Styrofoam, Styrene, has been identified as a carcinogen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, according to Amherst’s recycling Web page. The product also can’t be recycled at many places.

Susan Waite, Amherst’s recycling coordinator, said there are other, “typically organic based,” alternatives to foam containers. “Certain recyclable plastics, bleached paper and even aluminum,” she said, can be utilized as long as they lack a thick plastic lining.

The ban, though, has concerned some local business owners, who worry that an alternative product might cost more. Harold Tramazzo, the owner The Hangar restaurant and Wings Over Amherst, had told the Daily Hampshire Gazette that “it will put some out of business, maybe, and it will certainly raise prices.”

Big businesses in town, such as Dunkin’ Donuts, Cumberland Farms and Bertucci’s, will, despite being part of nationwide chains, also be required to adhere to the change.

Waite noted that Amherst would explore the formation of a buying consortium, reducing the cost of non-foam products for small businesses.  She also said that as the demand for more non-foam products increases, the price for them would likely drop.

But, according to reports from Amherst Town Manager John Musante, approximately 70 percent of Amherst restaurants already refrain from using disposable foam products, preferring the alternatives.

And the University of Massachusetts, Hampshire College and Amherst College have removed all foam disposables from their dining halls, according to a report in The Republican.

Amherst is not the only area that is banning the use of foam containers. Nantucket, Great Barrington and Brookline all voted to ban the product in the past, according to The Republican.

If foam containers are used and found in restaurants after the ban has gone into effect, the town’s health department will issue a written warning.  The restaurants that continue to use foam containers after being warned will face a fine of $100, followed by $250 for any subsequent violations.

The town’s Board of Health could issue a one-year hardship waiver to restaurants that apply for one.

The ban is slated to go into effect Jan. 1, 2014

 

Catherine Ferris can be reached at cferris@student.umass.edu.

 

 

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