July 28, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

UMass Rowing finishes NCAA Championships, ends year ranked No. 21 in the nation -

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Two UMass basketball alums to compete for a lofty prize in The Basketball Tournament -

Friday, May 23, 2014

Commencement Photos 2014 -

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Two arrested in relation to series of vandalism -

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Students push for relocation of the Center for Counseling and Psychological Health -

Monday, May 12, 2014

Video: No. 14 UMass WLAX ends season in loss to Loyola (MD) -

Saturday, May 10, 2014

No. 14 UMass women’s lacrosse season ends in loss to Loyola (MD) -

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Sixth inning rally propels UMass past Dayton 7-2 -

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

McMahon, Ferris and McGovern: Not your usual transfer story -

Sunday, May 4, 2014

Women’s lacrosse defeats Richmond 10-6 to win sixth straight A-10 Championship -

Sunday, May 4, 2014

No. 13 UMass women’s lacrosse knocks off Duquesne 16-3 to reach Atlantic 10 finals -

Friday, May 2, 2014

UMass one of 55 schools currently facing investigation over handling of sexual assault cases -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Two thefts reported at library -

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Senior Columns 2013-2014 -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

UMass Dining proposes major meal plan changes -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

UMass baseball beats UConn for first time since 2007 -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

MTV’s seemingly controversial new show proves to be ‘Faking It’ -

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Amherst Town Meeting bans Styrofoam

Flickr/ehud42

Restaurants in Amherst that use Styrofoam containers will soon have to find an alternative to the product after members of Amherst’s Town Meeting voted last month to ban the material, beginning in 2014.

The ban comes after news of health and environmental risks associated with the material, which is also known as expanded polystyrene.

One of the key ingredients in Styrofoam, Styrene, has been identified as a carcinogen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, according to Amherst’s recycling Web page. The product also can’t be recycled at many places.

Susan Waite, Amherst’s recycling coordinator, said there are other, “typically organic based,” alternatives to foam containers. “Certain recyclable plastics, bleached paper and even aluminum,” she said, can be utilized as long as they lack a thick plastic lining.

The ban, though, has concerned some local business owners, who worry that an alternative product might cost more. Harold Tramazzo, the owner The Hangar restaurant and Wings Over Amherst, had told the Daily Hampshire Gazette that “it will put some out of business, maybe, and it will certainly raise prices.”

Big businesses in town, such as Dunkin’ Donuts, Cumberland Farms and Bertucci’s, will, despite being part of nationwide chains, also be required to adhere to the change.

Waite noted that Amherst would explore the formation of a buying consortium, reducing the cost of non-foam products for small businesses.  She also said that as the demand for more non-foam products increases, the price for them would likely drop.

But, according to reports from Amherst Town Manager John Musante, approximately 70 percent of Amherst restaurants already refrain from using disposable foam products, preferring the alternatives.

And the University of Massachusetts, Hampshire College and Amherst College have removed all foam disposables from their dining halls, according to a report in The Republican.

Amherst is not the only area that is banning the use of foam containers. Nantucket, Great Barrington and Brookline all voted to ban the product in the past, according to The Republican.

If foam containers are used and found in restaurants after the ban has gone into effect, the town’s health department will issue a written warning.  The restaurants that continue to use foam containers after being warned will face a fine of $100, followed by $250 for any subsequent violations.

The town’s Board of Health could issue a one-year hardship waiver to restaurants that apply for one.

The ban is slated to go into effect Jan. 1, 2014

 

Catherine Ferris can be reached at cferris@student.umass.edu.

 

 

Leave A Comment