Scrolling Headlines:

UMass women’s soccer takes complete control in 3-1 win vs. Davidson -

September 25, 2017

Shaughnessy Naughton speaks on STEM professionals in politics -

September 25, 2017

ESPN author and journalist talks sports and mental health at UMass -

September 25, 2017

UMass men’s soccer remains unbeaten at home -

September 25, 2017

Minutewomen split Pennsylvania trip -

September 25, 2017

Kozlowski’s minutes limited for second straight game in loss versus Fordham -

September 25, 2017

Late penalty-kick goal not enough vs. Rams -

September 25, 2017

UMass football nearly upends Tennessee Saturday in 17-13 loss -

September 25, 2017

A conversation with the Pixies’ Joey Santiago -

September 25, 2017

The problem with peer mentors -

September 25, 2017

Jukebox the Ghost take Northampton by storm -

September 25, 2017

Let them eat cake -

September 24, 2017

Three weeks in, and two UMass fraternities under suspension -

September 23, 2017

UMPD crime alert informs campus of motor vehicle theft near Rudd Field Sept. 17 -

September 22, 2017

‘It’ has revitalized the modern monster movie -

September 21, 2017

UMass Republicans feel ostracized in political climate -

September 21, 2017

Irma hits Cuba, putting rain cloud over students’ study abroad plans -

September 21, 2017

UMass football travels to Tennessee for its first Power Five game of 2017 -

September 21, 2017

UMass women’s soccer looks ahead to Thursday matchup with Davidson -

September 21, 2017

Perussault and the Minutewomen are ready for the start of A-10 play -

September 21, 2017

Plastic bag ban for Amherst stores set to begin in 2017

(Daily Collegian Archives)

(Daily Collegian Archives)

Starting on Jan. 1, single-use plastic bags will be prohibited from all retail facilities in the town of Amherst in accordance with a bylaw passed May 26th in the Amherst Town Meeting.  The bylaw, supported by a vote of 110 to 30 in the Town Meeting, is known as Article 36: Single Use Plastic Bag Ban Prohibition. The bylaw was written by University of Massachusetts sustainability science graduate student, Keven Hollerbach.

What started out just as a graduate internship idea turned out to impact more people than Hollerbach first expected.

“[Plastic bags are] just straight up unnecessary,” Hollerbach said. “Plastic bags? We can get rid of those now.”

Hollerbach added that one bag has an average lifespan of 12 minutes, but a lifetime impact on marine life, pollution and humans.

“Incinerating plastic produces carcinogenic compounds that can cause significant adverse health effects for people living near these incineration plants,” Hollerbach said.

Businesses will be putting up signs to inform consumers of the coming change in policy. In addition, if a buisness is suffering due to the plastic bag ban, they will be able to request a one-year deferment from the Board of Health to meet their needs.

If a buisness does not comply, they will be issued a warning first, and then a $50 fine for the first day, which will add up for each day of the offense.

This bylaw is designed to encourage consumers to bring their own reusable bags in order to decrease the harm to the environment caused by plastic bags. According to a flyer in support for the bylaw, it is expensive to recycle and receive plastic bags from landfills.

Plastic, which takes 1,000 years to biodegrade, may also cause adverse health impacts to humans. According to findings in Scientific Ameican, various chemicals are added to plastic bags to make them more durable, but can have toxic impacts on human and animal reproduction cycles.

“Our generation is inheriting this planet,” Hollerbach said. “Therefore, we must do our part to preserve as much of it as we can.”

Melisa Joseph can be reached at mjoseph@umass.edu.

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