Letter: ‘Division’ review is appalling and embarrassing

By Casey Tylek

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Tom Clancys The Division Facebook page

Tom Clancy’s ‘The Division’ (Facebook)

Dear editor,

The terrible review of Tom Clancy’s The Division in Monday’s Daily Collegian reflects extremely poorly on the author issuing the review, and The Daily Collegian. A retraction should be issued, and so should apologies – one to readers for allowing such poor content to be printed, and also another to video gamers insulted with Nate’s stereotypes.

Upon reading Nate Taskin’s review of The Division, the only information the reader gains is what Nate’s political views are, and how he despises the (arguably realistic) environment and results of a fictional post-apocalyptic world. Instead of informing us about the gameplay, he launches into political grandstanding and labeling any aspect he does not like with misused words like facism, fetishizing, and genocide. For a person who seems to eschew inequality and hatred, he is also quick to incorrectly label and stereotype video gamers as unable to think critically.

To call this a video game review is wrong. Nowhere does he mention the quality of graphics, replay ability, game mechanics and multiplayer. This printing is so far from the bounds of a typical review, I thought I was reading a political op-ed. There are a few sentences that describe the premise of the story, and one sentence that vaguely mentions the ability to upgrade gear.

For all his arguments on art, he seems to have missed the point of First Person Shooters – to gauge your reaction time, dexterity and immediate ability to form an execute plans.

In my opinion, the editor-in-chief (Mark Chiarelli) of this paper, as well as the reviewer (Nate) should both be fired from their positions for cause immediately – Nate for being unable to write a review, and the editor-in-chief for publishing that hogwash which demonstrates an inability to uphold journalistic and editorial standards.
Casey Tylek