Scrolling Headlines:

Candlelight vigil held to mourn deaths of victims of police violence -

September 27, 2016

UMass hosts William A. Douglass for lecture and chair in Basque cultural studies -

September 27, 2016

Amherst Select Board discusses imposing fines on those who violate water usage ban -

September 27, 2016

UMass tennis opens season on high note with performance at Brown Invitational -

September 27, 2016

UMass women’s soccer using long break to prepare for Atlantic 10 play -

September 27, 2016

Notebook: Ford ‘takes step forward,’ Williams appears on SportsCenter -

September 27, 2016

UMass cross country and track and field coach Ken O’Brien hits half century mark with program -

September 27, 2016

A-10 soccer notebook: Duquesne shuts out Robert Morris 1-0 to win fourth straight -

September 27, 2016

The blue light situation: When is enough, enough? -

September 27, 2016

Survivor; awesome yet evil -

September 27, 2016

A ‘Mirror’ into Clinton’s campaign -

September 27, 2016

UMass a cappella groups S#arp Attitude and The Hexachord’s on ‘Sing It On’ television series -

September 27, 2016

‘Through the Photographer’s Eyes’ exhibit highlights photojournalism in today’s media -

September 27, 2016

Designer collaborations steal the show at New York Fashion Week SS17 -

September 27, 2016

Massachusetts drought heavily impacts local agriculture -

September 26, 2016

UMass Soccer earns second win of season in 3-2 victory over Hartford -

September 26, 2016

‘Morris from America’ explores teen angst and the struggles of growing up -

September 26, 2016

‘Hell or High Water’ an intense, morally ambiguous modern Western -

September 26, 2016

UMass field hockey hangs tough, falls to No. 18 Stanford -

September 26, 2016

Read: You won’t regret it -

September 26, 2016

Psych department looking for subjects

By: Emily Reynolds

 

Have you ever noticed the colorful papers that litter every table in the dining commons? They’re advertisements requesting students to e-mail or call the psychology department to provide them with subjects to collect data from. On the bulletin boards in each building, there are ads for eye-tracking testing to study how people read material.  Online, the kinesiology department has posted bulletins to look for people to participate in a diabetes experiment. Even in the advertisements of newspapers like The Daily Collegian, there are requests for students to participate in studies and experiments.

 

College professors all over the country are doing research on their own campuses. They’re hoping to make better medicine, figure out how the body works, how languages develop and much more. Students do a lot of research as well, especially graduate students or seniors working on their theses.

 

Both professors and students alike are performing experiments that require people, and they advertise to you. A lot of them even include a monetary compensation.

 

Some that don’t include compensation or a small amount are non-invasive and take very little time, like eye-tracking experiments in Tobin. These usually take about 30 minutes and simply require the subject to read and answer questions. Other experiments include larger compensation, but those can include taking blood or biopsies, and they’re usually done over an extended period of time. 

 

However, the studies aren’t just for college students. Many have larger age ranges from 18-65 years old, and college students happen to fall into the age range.

 

So, the next time you’re sitting at the dining commons or waiting for a friend next to a bulletin board, take a look. There might be some ads for help needed in a study, and it might be something really interesting.

 

Emily Reynolds can be reached at ereynold@student.umass.edu.

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