Scrolling Headlines:

UMass women’s soccer earns double overtime draw against Central Connecticut -

Friday, September 4, 2015

Offensive struggles continue for UMass men’s soccer team in loss to Columbia -

Friday, September 4, 2015

UMass field hockey pulls off thrilling overtime victory against Northeastern -

Thursday, September 3, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Kicking competition between Blake Lucas, Mike Caggiano nearing decision -

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Adam Liccardi found guilty in UMass rape trial -

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Jackson Porter adapting well following switch to wide receiver -

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Minutemen look for Robert Kitching to anchor defensive line -

Monday, August 31, 2015

Closing arguments delivered in Adam Liccardi rape trial -

Monday, August 31, 2015

Early goals sink UMass men’s soccer in loss to Saint Peter’s -

Monday, August 31, 2015

UMass field hockey splits weekend matches with UNH and BU -

Sunday, August 30, 2015

UMass women’s soccer struck by injuries, struggles offensively as it falls to No. 24 Rutgers -

Sunday, August 30, 2015

UMass men’s soccer drops season opener to Utah Valley in overtime -

Friday, August 28, 2015

UMass football notebook: Jackson Porter moves to WR, UMass schedules 2016 game with South Carolina -

Friday, August 28, 2015

Former UMass student who accused four men of rape in 2012 testifies during trial Friday -

Friday, August 28, 2015

REPORT: UMass football’s Da’Sean Downey faces two assault charges in connection with February fight -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

UMass football Media Day: Catching up with Joe Colton -

Thursday, August 27, 2015

UMass football fall camp: Creating turnovers, forcing mistakes the focus for linebacking corps -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Jurors hear police interview, read text messages by defendants in third UMass rape trial -

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

‘Living at UMass’ app aims to make move-in weekend a breeze -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

UMass rape trial halts abruptly, opening statements delivered Tuesday -

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

How new credit card rules will impact students

A series of new restrictions for credit card companies, which went info effect last week after being passed Congress a year ago, will impact anyone who has a credit card, but it will especially affect college students.

Credit card companies have long used questionable marketing practices in order to get America’s youth to sign up for a credit card. The companies often see young adults as being inexperienced with managing finances and therefore much more likely to misuse credit cards and therefore pay more in penalties.

“In spring of 2008, only 15 percent of freshmen had a zero balance, down dramatically from 69 percent in the fall of 2004. The median debt freshmen carried was $939, nearly triple the $373 in 2004,” according to Sallie Mae’s “How Undergraduate Students Use Credit Cards,” published April 2009.

Generally, credit card companies use methods such as switching payment dates and raising credit limits so that cardholders incur debt.  This extra debt means a number of new fees and increased interest rates, which is how these companies make their money.

With the new legislation kicking in, these practices have been at least regulated, if not banned.  The following restrictions in the “Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act” (Credit CARD Act) passed on March 19, 2009, will directly affect students:

  • New laws will require a co-signer for student applicants under 21, unless they can prove they have a steady source of income.
  • No more freebies: companies are no longer allowed to offer students token gifts such as free pizza or t-shirts, etc. just for applying.
  • Fewer prescreened offers, meaning companies such as Equifax or Experian can not send credit card companies your information in order for them to send out “pre-approved offers.”
  • More transparency about college affinity card programs, meaning that credit card companies will have to disclose their marketing deals with colleges to the Federal Reserve Board.  Schools must also disclose how much they make off these deals.
  • Colleges are urged to limit, or restrict, credit card marketing on their campus.

While these new regulations will limit the credit card companies’ ability to use their old tricks, it certainly does not prevent them from implementing new ones.

“Of the 10 practices that have been outlawed, the credit card companies have already found eight new devices for getting around them,” said Elizabeth Warren, Chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel, in a recent television interview.

Even with all their traps, credit card companies cannot take advantage of consumers if the cardholder borrows responsibly and takes the time to read the fine print on their statements. Just keep one thing in mind: caveat emptor, these companies are after their pound of flesh.

Matt Bouteillier can be reached at mbouteil@student.umass.edu.

Leave A Comment