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Carl Pierre’s breakout performance helps UMass men’s basketball over Western Carolina -

November 22, 2017

Pipkins’ double-double leads UMass men’s basketball over Western Carolina -

November 21, 2017

Luwane Pipkins leads the UMass men’s basketball shooting show in 101-76 win over Niagara -

November 19, 2017

UMass to face tough test with Niagara backcourt -

November 19, 2017

Hockey Notebook: John Leonard on an early season tear for UMass hockey -

November 18, 2017

Clock runs out on UMass men’s soccer’s dream season in NCAA opener -

November 17, 2017

2017 Basketball Special Issue -

November 16, 2017

UMass men’s basketball prepares for transitional season in 2017-18 -

November 16, 2017

Author Viet Thanh Nguyen discusses how history and humanity is remembered -

November 16, 2017

CMASS completes seven-week discussion series -

November 16, 2017

UMass women’s basketball resets and reloads, looking to improve on last year’s record with plenty of new talent -

November 16, 2017

Matt McCall’s winding path to bring unity to UMass -

November 16, 2017

Carl Pierre is a piece to Matt McCall’s basketball program -

November 16, 2017

Why they stayed: Malik Hines, Chris Baldwin and C.J. Anderson -

November 16, 2017

McConnell chooses politics over morals -

November 16, 2017

Swipe right for love? Probably not. -

November 16, 2017

‘The Florida Project’ is a monument to the other side of paradise -

November 16, 2017

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ doesn’t have to be the best Marvel movie -

November 16, 2017

Thursday’s NCAA tournament rematch between UMass men’s soccer and Colgate will be a battle of adjustments -

November 15, 2017

Veteran belonging and the decline of American communities discussed by journalist and author at Amherst College -

November 15, 2017

Our eyes are bigger than our stomachs: the problem of food waste

As the holidays approach and we fantasize about the pounds of turkey, hoards of vegetables, and gluttonous amounts of sweets to be consumed, we are usually too caught up in our food lust to think about how much of that food will go to waste.  According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. generates roughly 30 million tons of food waste each year. Yard trimmings and food residuals together constitute 26 percent of the U.S. municipal solid waste stream. That’s a lot of useful material that could be turned into beneficial product instead of sitting in landfills leaking toxic gases into the atmosphere.

Now, you may ask, “So what? There is plenty of food in the world to go around.”  In fact, you are correct.  There is indeed enough available food to feed the entire global population of 6.7 billion people.  However, about 25,000 people die every day of hunger or hunger-related causes.  This is because much of that available food is over exploited and wasted; for example, your eight course Thanksgiving dinner leftovers and trash could have been another family’s entire meal.

So now you know that waste is a problem, but what can you do to help reduce? To start, try to consume less. Have you ever heard the expression “your eyes are bigger than your stomach”? Basically what this means is only buy, make, or produce what you are going to consume, not what you want to consume.  Your waste could be someone else’s meal, and based on the above statistics, there are a lot of people who are literally dying for your waste.

Here at UMass, if you have yet to notice, our beloved food trays are missing from the DC’s. That is an effort by UMass to reduce food waste by limiting the amount of food people can pile up and leave for waste. According to Ken Toong, Executive Director of Auxiliary Enterprises, trayless dining (along with education and a few other programs) has already helped reduce food waste up to 30 percent.

If you followed the above guidelines but still find yourself with excess food, there other ways you can make sure it doesn’t go directly to waste. For example, compost to improve soil fertility, donate perishables and convert excess food into animal feed so you can feed two mouths by only producing for one!

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News-2-Know is a blog created by B.J. Roche’s Journalism 301 class. Every weekday, an author will write about a topic that is newsworthy and provide links on additional resources.

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