A Day to Remember makes an album to remember

By Rachel Arlin

It has been over three years since A Day to Remember released their last album, “What Separates Me from You.” A Day to Remember is the type of band whose style changes dramatically with each new album it releases. Its newest LP “Common Courtesy,” which was released on Oct. 8, is no exception.

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A Day to Remember has always been a pop punk band, and this genre can be used to describe most of their new album. For those who like to mosh, the band included some much heavier rock songs, but that is not to say they have done away with their signature slow headbanging drum beat. The band is also well known for their acoustic ballads, which fans can be assured are present on the new “Common Courtesy.”

Even before the official release of the new album, A Day to Remember had already released two singles. These tracks, “Violence (Enough Is Enough)” and “Right Back At It Again,” were released through At the Drive In’s exclusive fan club, where members with special access were able to preview these songs before the album’s release. The response was great and earned fantastic publicity for “Common Courtesy.”

The album begins with a grateful tone, well aware of how far the band has come. Tracks like “City of Ocala” and “Right Back At It Again” start the album off on a happy note. Catchy lyrics and solid pop punk beats accompany reflections on how the band and its members have changed since it formed.

The middle of “Common Courtesy” is where the more familiar sounds of A Day to Remember begin to emerge. “Dead & Buried,” “Violence (Enough Is Enough)” and “Life @ 11” show the band’s signature electric guitar and drum beats. It is assuring for any fan, regardless of the era they became a listener, that the band they have come to know has included older songwriting elements for its newest album.

One of the more unique sounding songs on the album is “Life Lessons Learned the Hard Way.” This track tells the jarring and vivid story of an assault and then an eventual suicide. It is sung in a much more violent and chaotic way than any other track on “Common Courtesy.”

The final song on the album, “I Remember,” is the longest track A Day to Remember has ever put out, clocking in at just over nine minutes. Like the beginning of the album, the band reflects on their humble beginnings to their successful presents. The song itself comes to an end around three minutes, but the remainder of the track features the band members recounting stories from before the band formed. Some stories are ridiculous in nature, while others are touching; one such story revolved around the members of the Florida-based band witnessing snow for the first time.

There is no doubt that this band has expanded both lyrically and musically since its humble beginnings. Their fanbase has grown tremendously and they have even sold out one of their latest upcoming tour dates. Any A Day to Remember fan will appreciate this album for combining both old and new song elements and for not forgetting its roots.

Rachel Arlin can be reached at [email protected]