January 26, 2015

Scrolling Headlines:

Paranormal Research Society seeks to uncover the truth about the supernatural -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass tops Merrimack 4-1 to cap off successful weekend series -

Monday, January 26, 2015

‘Broad City’s’ second season off to a wickedly funny start -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Students respond to Obama’s State of the Union address -

Monday, January 26, 2015

St. Bonaventure earns tight victory, VCU clinches 11th straight win in Atlantic 10 men’s basketball action -

Monday, January 26, 2015

An open letter to the people who were kind when I was struggling -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass club hockey salvages weekend with tie against NYU on Saturday -

Monday, January 26, 2015

2015 Winter TCA’s announce bevy of show returns and new releases -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Brilliant online film archives for cinema lovers -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass men’s and women’s track and field teams see mixed results in Joe Donahue Indoor Games -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Steve Mastalerz, defense delivers for UMass hockey -

Monday, January 26, 2015

UMass online graduate programs climb U.S. News & World Report rankings -

Monday, January 26, 2015

Front to Back: Week of Jan. 25, 2015 -

Sunday, January 25, 2015

BLOG: UMass football receives seven verbal commitments -

Sunday, January 25, 2015

UMass plans to fail again with Super Bowl guest policy -

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Special teams play fuels late UMass rally, forces tie -

Saturday, January 24, 2015

BLOG: UMass hires Mark Michaels as special teams coordinator, outside linebackers coach -

Friday, January 23, 2015

Former Tibetan political prisoner overcomes odds in Tibet and the US -

Thursday, January 22, 2015

UMass basketball falls flat in loss to St. Joe’s -

Thursday, January 22, 2015

‘Selma’ resonates with the here and now -

Thursday, January 22, 2015

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Don’t Blame it on the Alcohol

( HANS DERYK, REUTERS / Courtesy of the Hartford Courant)

On Oct. 10, Theo Epstein fled Boston for the Chicago Cubs. To make matters worse, The Boston Globe printed a scathing article on the Red Sox’s collapse that same morning,

The piece was ripped apart almost instantaneously by pundits who cited the author’s many unnamed sources as shady journalism. Personally, the unnamed sources doesn’t particularly bother me. I do, however, have a problem with the implications of the article.

The article implies that  John Lackey, Jon Lester, and Josh Beckett are responsible for the Sox collapse due to their frequent in-game clubhouse hangouts, which allegedly included beer, fried chicken, and video games.

The September struggles of Beckett, Lester, and Lackey have been well documented, as they should be.

That being said, the trio did not start all 28 September games for Boston. In fact they started 15 of them, leaving the remaining 13 starts to Tim Wakefield, Kyle Weilland, Erik Bedard, and Andrew Miller.

Those 13 starts went extremely poorly, with just three resulting in a win for the Red Sox.

Ultimately, the backend of the rotation was completely unable to log quality innings for the floundering Sox team.

Here was the extent of the September contributions from Weilland, Miller, Wakefield, and Bedard:

Weilland started three games and went 0-2.

Miller lasted just in an inning and a third in one of his starts and allowed 11 runs over the span of two games.

Wakefield pitched respectable for the most part, but also allowed at least five runs in all four of his starts.

Bedard’s last two starts came against weak-hitting Baltimore, but somehow managed to throw just six combined innings against the O’s.

What disappoints me about the article is that there are a number of other reasons why the Sox collapsed, and none of them include a couple pitchers downing some beers in the clubhouse.

How about Daniel Bard single-handedly costing Boston at least three games?

How about just terrible luck in general? According to The New York Times statistician, Nate Silver, the events that unfolded in September could only happen once in 278 million tries.

Blame the collapse on poor starting pitching, a poor bullpen, untimely hitting, or terrible luck, but don’t think that the actions of a few misbehaving pitchers cost Boston a playoff spot.

Jackson Alexander can be reached for comment at jtalexan@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “Don’t Blame it on the Alcohol”
  1. Deborah says:

    Lackey was definitely in my opinion the worst of the pitchers excluding Weiland. Andrew Miller had some respectable starts and may I remind you that mostly in September he didn’t even pitch but once. Wakefield should have been put out of his misery after he won his 200th win. Mostly Lackey and Bedard plus a little help from Bard made the Red Sox lose and the beer evidently didn’t help did it for Lester and Beckett, did it? I rest my case.

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