August 23, 2014

Scrolling Headlines:

UMass crime alerts reveal reports of lewd acts -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass women’s soccer hopes added depth brings more consistency in 2014 -

Friday, August 22, 2014

UMass mourns death of alumnus and journalist James Foley -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Kassan Messiah, Trey Seals to shoulder pass rushing responsibility for UMass football -

Thursday, August 21, 2014

UMass names Blake Frohnapfel as the starting quarterback -

Monday, August 18, 2014

Decision looms for Mark Whipple as UMass football looks to name starting quarterback -

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Former UMass star Marcel Shipp overseeing a strong running back competition -

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Former UMass basketball star Chaz Williams signs professional contract in Turkey, still eyeing NBA career -

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Minutemen anxious to display aggressive defense -

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

UMass football turns the page, excited for 2014 season -

Monday, August 4, 2014

UMass student struck and killed by vehicle Thursday night -

Friday, August 1, 2014

UMass receives anonymous $10.3 million gift -

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

UMass football summer coverage 2014 -

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Chiarelli: Sam Koch’s impact evident in those who knew him best -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Longtime UMass men’s soccer coach Sam Koch dies after two-year battle with sinus cancer -

Monday, July 21, 2014

Southwest evacuated after gas leak -

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

UMass Rowing finishes NCAA Championships, ends year ranked No. 21 in the nation -

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Two UMass basketball alums to compete for a lofty prize in The Basketball Tournament -

Friday, May 23, 2014

Commencement Photos 2014 -

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Two arrested in relation to series of vandalism -

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Don’t Blame it on the Alcohol

( HANS DERYK, REUTERS / Courtesy of the Hartford Courant)

On Oct. 10, Theo Epstein fled Boston for the Chicago Cubs. To make matters worse, The Boston Globe printed a scathing article on the Red Sox’s collapse that same morning,

The piece was ripped apart almost instantaneously by pundits who cited the author’s many unnamed sources as shady journalism. Personally, the unnamed sources doesn’t particularly bother me. I do, however, have a problem with the implications of the article.

The article implies that  John Lackey, Jon Lester, and Josh Beckett are responsible for the Sox collapse due to their frequent in-game clubhouse hangouts, which allegedly included beer, fried chicken, and video games.

The September struggles of Beckett, Lester, and Lackey have been well documented, as they should be.

That being said, the trio did not start all 28 September games for Boston. In fact they started 15 of them, leaving the remaining 13 starts to Tim Wakefield, Kyle Weilland, Erik Bedard, and Andrew Miller.

Those 13 starts went extremely poorly, with just three resulting in a win for the Red Sox.

Ultimately, the backend of the rotation was completely unable to log quality innings for the floundering Sox team.

Here was the extent of the September contributions from Weilland, Miller, Wakefield, and Bedard:

Weilland started three games and went 0-2.

Miller lasted just in an inning and a third in one of his starts and allowed 11 runs over the span of two games.

Wakefield pitched respectable for the most part, but also allowed at least five runs in all four of his starts.

Bedard’s last two starts came against weak-hitting Baltimore, but somehow managed to throw just six combined innings against the O’s.

What disappoints me about the article is that there are a number of other reasons why the Sox collapsed, and none of them include a couple pitchers downing some beers in the clubhouse.

How about Daniel Bard single-handedly costing Boston at least three games?

How about just terrible luck in general? According to The New York Times statistician, Nate Silver, the events that unfolded in September could only happen once in 278 million tries.

Blame the collapse on poor starting pitching, a poor bullpen, untimely hitting, or terrible luck, but don’t think that the actions of a few misbehaving pitchers cost Boston a playoff spot.

Jackson Alexander can be reached for comment at jtalexan@student.umass.edu.

Comments
One Response to “Don’t Blame it on the Alcohol”
  1. Deborah says:

    Lackey was definitely in my opinion the worst of the pitchers excluding Weiland. Andrew Miller had some respectable starts and may I remind you that mostly in September he didn’t even pitch but once. Wakefield should have been put out of his misery after he won his 200th win. Mostly Lackey and Bedard plus a little help from Bard made the Red Sox lose and the beer evidently didn’t help did it for Lester and Beckett, did it? I rest my case.

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